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Cannabis can cause drowsiness and impair your ability to concentrate and make quick decisions. If you choose to consume cannabis, delay use to later in life. Teenagers and young adults are at greater risk of harms because the brain continues to develop until around the age of 25.

You may not sell the cannabis you grow at home to others. The Cannabis Act permits adults to cultivate up to 4 cannabis plants per household (not per person). Some provinces and territories have applied added restrictions on personal cultivation. There are recommended safety and security measures for growing cannabis plants. You need to be licensed by Health Canada to be able to grow cannabis for sale. In some cases, you may also need a licence from the Canada Revenue Agency to sell cannabis. Legal cannabis products must carry an excise stamp, except those products with less than 0.3% THC or no THC. We are committed to keeping a distinct system for giving patients reasonable access to cannabis for medical purposes.

Cannabis for medical purposes will continue to be legal if you are: authorized by a health care provider registered with a licensed seller or with Health Canada. Funding for cannabis public education and research. We fund community-based and Indigenous public education and research initiatives. To apply for funding please see the Substance Use and Addictions Program - Call for Proposals - Guidelines for Applicants. Law enforcement is trained to detect drug-impaired driving. Learn more about detecting drug-impaired driving under Cannabis impairment. There's A 'Legal High' You Can Buy Online, And It Isn't Cannabis. A recent study by a group of scientists in Bern, Switzerland examining a cannabinoid extracted from a rare moss-like plant--a member of the liverwort family--growing only in Japan, New Zealand, and Costa Rica has revealed potentially useful properties that may be valuable for people suffering with inflammation and chronic pain. Liverwort (Radula perrottetii) University of Bern/Stefan Fischer. What’s even more interesting is that this moss is distantly related to a plant we are quite familiar with--Cannabis Sativa -- which has more recently emerged as a potential approach for treating seizures, multiple sclerosis, inflammation, and many chronic medical conditions. Thus far, the researchers do not understand why this specific liverwort--which has a different way of living and reproducing compared with Cannabis—would harbor a compound so similar to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component found in marijuana. (It was previously believed that the only plant that produces THC was Cannabis Sativa.) What they do realize is that the cannabinoid isolated from this liverwort, and THC found in Cannabis are chemically similar , but also produce quite similar effects in the brains of mammals. FDA: Don’t Use These 9 Hand Sanitizers Due To Toxic Ingredient. Face Masks May Be The Key Determinant Of The Covid-19 Curve, Study Suggests. The study was recently published in the Journal, Science Advances . PET was first described in 1994 by the Japanese phytochemist, Yoshinori Asakawa. But it wasn’t until Jürg Gertsch from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine at the University of Bern, evaluated the similarity of this compound in structure and activity to THC in the brains of mammals that the significance became more relevant. Several years ago, Gertsch noticed that liverworts were being promoted online as "legal highs", used by recreational and medicinal users in Switzerland, New Zealand, as well as other areas of the world. But no research had been done to evaluate the pharmacological properties of the cannabinoids contained in the plant. Gertsch joined forces with his colleague, Erick Carreira, from the Department of Chemistry at the ETH Zürich, and proceeded to compare THC and PET. Using an animal model (mice), the team demonstrated that PET reaches the brain relatively easily, but activates cannabinoid receptors-- CB1 and CB2 receptors--to a much weaker degree compared with THC. As a result, a key difference between the two compounds is that PET is much less psychoactive compared with THC, making it more attractive for medicinal as opposed to recreational purposes. But PET’s more potent anti-inflammatory effects, compared with THC, based on initial studies, certainly became a point of further interest. Gertsch believes that PET’s more robust anti-inflammatory effect in the brain compared with THC, makes it noteworthy, especially if you consider its potential medical applications. "It's astonishing that only two species of plants, separated by 300 million years of evolution, produce psychoactive cannabinoids," said Gertsch in a press release .

And it turns out that the Maori people, indigenous to New Zealand, have utilized the liverwort plant for centuries as a traditional medicine for treating abnormalities of the liver or digestive issues.

“The work of Jürg Gertsch and colleagues is a prominent advance in understanding the role of plants beyond cannabis on the endocannabinoid system,” said Ethan Russo M.D., a neurologist, and Director of Research and Development for International Cannabis and Cannabinoids Institute (ICCI). “Perrottetinene from the liverwort, Radula marginata, has proven to stimulate weakly the CB1 receptor where THC and the endocannabinoids, anandamide (ANA) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) also bind. “Although this activity was proven via positive effects on the mouse tetrad of hypothermia (lowered temperature), catalepsy (frozen behavior), hypolocomotion (decreased movement) and analgesia (pain reduction), and was demonstrated to enter the brain, it is unlikely to become a major target of recreation users because of its relatively low potency and especially since liverworts are very slow growing and difficult to cultivate.” added Russo. Russo also explained that “perrottetinene differs from THC in a key way that makes it potentially useful medically, in that it reduces levels of prostaglandins D2 and E2 in the brain without producing COX inhibition, and thus may provide an effective anti-inflammatory and pain killer with a low risk of intoxication, formation of ulcers, or production of heart attacks or strokes.

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