2020

If you’re currently taking medication and would like to try CBD, it’s essential to discuss this with your doctor. When side effects do occur, however, they may include diarrhea, appetite changes, and fatigue. fatigue diarrhea changes in appetite changes in weight.

If you’re looking for a quick and easy way to buy CBD, you can find many CBD brands online. But make sure you research each brand before purchasing. While pure, genuine CBD is considered safe, fake and low-quality products can be dangerous. CBD isn’t regulated by the FDA, so it’s up to you to make sure that you’re only using high-quality products. Look for products from a reputable brand with third-party testing, and avoid companies that have a history of inaccurate labeling. A 2018 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) noted that 52 Utah residents had bad reactions to certain CBD products. It turned out that most of them used products that included synthetic CBD. Some products contained no information about the manufacturer or its ingredients. When it comes to working out which dosage of CBD you should use, talking to your doctor is your best bet.

While not all doctors will be able to provide information on CBD — depending on the laws in your state — some may be able to help recommend dosages or high-quality brands. Speak with your doctor before trying CBD, especially if you’re currently taking any medications. Click here for more product reviews, recipes, and research-based articles about CBD from Healthline. Hemp-derived CBD products (with less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal on the federal level, but are still illegal under some state laws. Marijuana-derived CBD products are illegal on the federal level, but are legal under some state laws. Check your state’s laws and those of anywhere you travel. Keep in mind that nonprescription CBD products are not FDA-approved, and may be inaccurately labeled. Sian Ferguson is a freelance writer and editor based in Cape Town, South Africa. Her writing covers issues relating to social justice, cannabis, and health. Are you ready for a taste of the least controversial method of consuming cannabis ever? Because tinctures have been described as the most underrated of all the pot products. They’re described as such because there aren’t as many fun — and potentially punishable — reefer rituals associated with their use. But that doesn’t mean that they’re somehow second-rate. Tinctures are arguably underutilized compared to raw flowers, joints , blunts , bongs , edibles , and dabs even though they work just as well…or sometimes even better. For many people, tinctures often work better than every other method of cannabis consumption, including cream , pills , gummies , and dissolvable strips . It really depends on what you need from your marijuana and how you prefer to take it. In this article, the experts at Honest Marijuana tell you everything you need to know about marijuana tinctures. Along the way, we’ll discuss: A brief history of the marijuana tincture The basic science of tinctures The benefits of marijuana tincture The side effects of marijuana tincture How to take a marijuana tincture The economics of marijuana tincture How to make a marijuana tincture. We’ll also share three different tried-and-true marijuana tincture recipes for you to experiment with at home. Before we get to that, though, let’s delve briefly into the history of marijuana tinctures. In spite of how novel they may seem to so many cannabis consumers, tinctures are really nothing new. In fact, tincture was the primary form of cannabis medicine until it was banned in 1937 . You may not have heard about marijuana tinctures yet because an eyedropper full of medicine just doesn’t have the same stigma as edibles or dabbing . You don’t need a creme brulee blowtorch in order to medicate with a tincture, which is why tinctures don’t have any derogatory mainstream media monikers like “the crack of cannabis.” You’re also much less likely to overdose or “overdowd” on a cannabis tincture than you are with a marijuana edible for reasons we’ll explain later in this post. And lest you wonder what “overdowd” means, it’s a slang portmanteau of the words “over” (as in overdose) and “dowd” (the last name of journalist Maureen Dowd).

Some years ago, while writing a piece on the nascent marijuana industry in Colorado, Ms. Dowd consumed too much of a cannabis-infused candy bar — despite prior warnings — and went on a really bad trip. “I became convinced that I had died and no one was telling me,” Ms. This event earned her the dubious honor of having a semi-derogatory, completely-mocking word “named” after her. Tinctures have been described as the moonshine of marijuana because of how they are made. However, making marijuana tincture takes up much less space and is significantly less likely to cause an explosion than a traditional moonshine still. Making tinctures is much less dangerous (and therefore less controversial) than making cannabis concentrates with butane, for example. Your chances of creating an explosion that will destroy your entire house are non-existent with most tincture making. Now that you know a few facts about marijuana tinctures, let’s investigate the science behind what makes a tincture a tincture.

We’re not going to get too involved in the science of tinctures, but we will touch on a few key scientific facts that will help you understand tinctures better. A tincture is most often an alcoholic extract of plant material (although animal material can also be used) with an ethanol percentage of between 25 and 60%. This equates to a solution that is between 50 and 120 proof, although sometimes the alcohol concentration can get as high as 90% (180 proof) in some tinctures. Alcohol (ethanol) is the most common solvent because it’s effective at breaking down both acidic and basic components of the plant matter. In the case of a cannabis tincture, that means that more of the good-for-your cannabinoids will wind up in your little dropper bottle.

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