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Chill your dinner wine from warm storage to the proper serving temperature in minutes–especially if you do not have an expensive purpose built wine refrigerator. Perfect way to chill wine that dinner guests may bring as a gift. Great for informal get-togethers when you suddenly decide to have friends or family over to watch the “game” on TV or stay for dinner. With the use of a DC/inverter adapter, its great for portability situations like at tailgates, boats, RVs.

The Cooper Cooler™ Tailgater™ which comes with a 12V car plug makes tailgating even easier–it only has a small 30 watt draw. Free up limited cooler space for other perishables like food. Store your beverages warm and chill them on demand. Use the ice you have more efficiently by chilling your beverages on demand. Free up valuable refrigerator space for other perishables, store your beverages warm and Chill-On-Demand™ For those who have to use communal refrigerators, no need to worry about your beverages being stolen. Keep them safe in your dormitory or office and Chill-On-Demand™. For those who like their beverages served “ice cold”, chill your already refrigerated drinks down to 34°F/1°C with the Cooper Cooler™ Evenly warm baby bottles contents in one to two minutes without the formation of “hot pockets” which could potentially scald your infant. To explain why carbonated beverages don’t fizz over when rotated, you have to know why they do fizz over when shaken. A carbonated beverage is one in which carbon dioxide is dissolved in the liquid under pressure (that’s Henry’s Law). When the pressure is reduced (upon opening), the liquid is capable of holding less carbon dioxide (C02), and the CO2 will come out of solution.

Whether they fizz over (liquid comes out of the container) depends on how quickly CO2 comes out of solution. In order for CO2 to come out of solution, it needs a ‘nucleation site’ to do so. Those nucleation sites can be either gaseous pockets, or an irregularity along the wall. (Look at how a stream of bubbles form on a specific spot on a glass of beer or soda. You can’t see it, but that spot is an irregularity.) When a beverage is shaken, the air pocket is broken up into a zillion small pockets dispersed throughout the beverage. When the container is opened, CO2 in solution has sites all over the place, and it comes out of solution so quickly, that the liquid has no time to get out of the way, and it rises up and out, that is, it fizzes over. When a beverage is rotated, the air pocket basically stays intact. There are no nucleation sites dispersed throughout, and the usual slow decarbonation takes place at the infrequent irregularities, and at the surface. The amount of ice is the same as if you added the ice directly to the beverage. This amounts to roughly 4 typical ice cubes (25ml each) for each beverage chilled. One tray of ice (assuming 16 cubes about an inch each side) will chill 2 beverages (12 ounces). For the first tray, about 8 ice cubes are melted in making the re-circulating water cold. The remaining 8 cubes are then available to chill 2 beverages. The second tray of ice will chill 4 because the re-circulating water is already cold. The material is thicker in bottles, and the material acts like a thermal insulator. Bottles, whether plastic or glass, act as insulators. You can’t get the re-circulating water lower than its freezing point (32°F/0°C). You can’t get the beverage colder than the re-circulating water, but you can get it to that temperature if you run an extra long Cooper Cooler™ cycle. However, if you add a solute (like salt or ethanol) to the recycling water to lower the freezing temperature, you can chill your beverage below the freezing temperature of water. Warning: Using salt in the Cooper Cooler will cause it to corrode and will void the warranty. Ethanol in the form of ordinary spirits works well, although it can get expensive. The hottest you can get a beverage is the temperature of the re-circulating water you add. Adding water any hotter than 140°F/60°C and the Cooper Cooler™ might be deformed. If you are using the Cooper Cooler™ to warm a baby bottle, the milk or formula will never be hotter than the water you add to the unit. There are 2 main types of chillers/coolers that are in direct competition to the Cooper Cooler™: A) Peltier chillers which are also called thermo-electric chillers.

Let’s first quickly explain how these devices work using the Peltier Effect or Principle. Simply put, the Peltier Effect occurs when you run electricity through two dissimilar metals or through two dissimilar semi-conductor materials which causes one side to become hot and the other to become cold. The cold side is in direct contact with the metal of the chill chamber which in turn over time gets cold. The wine bottle is placed into the unit in a vertical orientation through an opening on top of the unit into the chill chamber. These devices are only useful for maintaining your wine bottle’s current temperature and are not useful for rapidly chilling a warm wine bottle. In fact, the more truthful marketers of these devices will even state in their instruction manual that the wine bottle must already be chilled before using their device or else it will take hours to chill it down to a realistic serving temperature. A regular refrigerator will actually chill much faster than these devices since they are completely sealed to allow the cold air to do its job of chilling the bottle. As stated these devices do not completely enclose the entire wine bottle and hence whatever cold air is produced can easily escape.

Because of this, some manufacturers include a collar to wrap around the bottle’s neck to prevent this, however this still does not do much for chilling the bottle. HOW DOES THE COOPER COOLER™ COMPARE: The Cooper Cooler™ is over 100 times faster than these Peltier devices because ice cold water is a much more efficient means of transferring cold versus cold air.

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