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you may feel better more quickly after a hard workout but your fitness might not increase as fast over the long term. People have asked similar questions about anti-oxidants and NSAIDs. Also, Topical Edge seems to have deleted your white paper from their site. ------------- Ed O'Malley www.VeloVetta.com VeloVetta is developing AERO cycling shoes with CFD and wind tunnel testing. A simple question: how does it get through the skin and into the bloodstream and/or muscles?

It's always been my understanding that anything applied to the skin that actually delivers a substance to the bloodstream (transdermal) is classified as a drug or medicine. If the former, then how does it get to any muscles or the bloodstream? If not yet patent-protected, is it not a banned substance (like glycerol)? ---------------------------------- "i disagree with your analysis [or judgment], nevertheless you have the responsibility of moderating this board so i honor your authority to make the moderating decisions." Those training questions are what we'll be looking at in the webinar. Topical Edge still has our white paper on the website. They probably just took down the big "click here" button off the home page. Great question about how it works and their technology. That's a closely guarded trade secret that Ampersand Pharmaceuticals estimates is worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

I assume they won't be giving that one away other than saying "it's their proprietary technology." Most of your questions are on their website so poke around there as there's lots of information. It is not banned and it is certified by Informed Sport, the bottom right of the page has some of that stuff. It's a patent pending application that works through dermis and capillaries, which is regulated by the FDA as a topical analgesic. Menthol is listed as active ingredient per FDA regs, which dictate what's listed as active or inactive (and they don't consider bicarb as active). Informed Sport certified for WADA banned substances. Is it correct that sodium bicarbonate is effective for anaerobic work, but not aerobic work? If the protocol did not include a 30 second maximum effort prior to the 5 minute time trial, would one expect to see any benefit? ------------- Ed O'Malley www.VeloVetta.com VeloVetta is developing AERO cycling shoes with CFD and wind tunnel testing. Is it correct that sodium bicarbonate is effective for anaerobic work, but not aerobic work? If the protocol did not include a 30 second maximum effort prior to the 5 minute time trial, would one expect to see any benefit? Coggan around a week ago chose this literature survey summary: "Enhanced performance (в€ј2%) of short-term, high-intensity sprints lasting в€ј60 s in duration, with a reduced efficacy as the effort duration exceeds 10 min" Dr. Kern's study was unable to find any TT benefit at 5 minutes or 1 hour. The Source Endurance non-clinical study and some other studies show benefit in #-of-intervals-to-exhaustion, with the intervals being very short, e.g. in the Source Endurance study the test population was able to complete 17 30-second intervals vs. (with 20 seconds rest) So the totality of evidence so far suggests that sodium biocarbonate is near useless for any TT-style effort beyond 10 minutes. So doesn't seem to make sense for triathletes, time-triallists, or runners who go longer than 3-5K. I mean "near useless" in terms of direct performance benefit. I'm not counting DOMS reduction or other purported benefits from chronic use. In terms of "endurance sports" it might make sense for roadies who may have to repeatedly dip into 30-second max-type efforts while attacking (or covering attacks). The type of racing that most closely matches short-intervals-to-exhaustion studies might be track racing. Points racing, madison, and miss-n-out races all involve doing things very much like short, intense intervals with some rest in between. I'l try them out in my track points races and give my n=1 results. although it'll be near useless feedback since points race success is dominated by situational tactics. Nothing magic either way - it was my first experience on a hard ride with it. My legs held up well, but I was also in very good shape for it.

It's definitely nice though even just as embrocation. No meaningful conclusions of any kind at this point. This sort of thing is really hard to A/B test, but I might try some hard trainer sessions to give it a shot. "Non est ad astra mollis e terris via." - Seneca | rappstar.com | FB - Rappstar Racing | IG - @jordanrapp | Game Designer @ Zwift. I was curious and signed up for Topical Edge emails. Followed the link to the reviews and didn't find this one. This isn't a form of marketing that makes me trust Topical Edge:) I have been using for about a year. Using for hard sessions (bike racer only) and racing as well as all harder rides or long during bigger training block. Not sure if mental or not but I feel it works , during legs feel better, less burn.

But best yet is feel I recover faster for next day. My 2cents but not many things I spend money on since I am cheap -outside of bike stuff but this is worth a try. So it doesn't completely eliminate DOMS or lactic acid failure, it just delays and reduces it.

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