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Whole Foods Market expands topical CBD products to more than 350 locations in 30 states

AUSTIN, Texas (Sept. 18, 2019 ) — Whole Foods Market is expanding distribution of topical CBD products to 13 additional states this month, making CBD products available in a total of 359 Whole Foods Market stores across the U.S. Along with the broadened availability, the retailer is also adding exclusive CBD bath items from Pacha Soap Co., including CBD Mineral Soak, CBD Whipped Soap, CBD Bar Soap and CBD Froth Bombs.

“Our shoppers have expressed a growing interest in CBD products,” said Jennifer Coleman, Global Senior Category Merchant for Whole Foods Market. “We’re thrilled to roll out topical CBD products in even more stores and to share new, exclusive items from our longstanding supplier partner Pacha Soap Co.”

As of September 2019, Whole Foods Market now carries topical CBD products in 30 states: Alabama, Arkansas*, Arizona*, California*, Colorado, District of Columbia, Georgia*, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas*, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan*, Mississippi, Missouri*, Nevada*, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oklahoma*, Oregon, Pennsylvania*, South Carolina*, Tennessee, Texas*, Utah, Virginia* and Wisconsin.

As with all body care items sold at Whole Foods Market, the new CBD products meet the grocer’s rigorous body care quality standards, which ban parabens, phthalates, triclosan and more than 100 other questionable ingredients used in conventional body care products.

From October 4 to October 6, beauty and body care products, including topical CBD and the new Pacha Soap Co. bath products, will be 25% off as part of Whole Foods Market’s fall Beauty, Bath and Body Care Sale. Prime members receive an additional 10% off the discounted price.

*New distribution as of September 2019

Whole Foods Market expands topical CBD products to more than 350 locations in 30 states AUSTIN, Texas (Sept. 18, 2019 ) — Whole Foods Market is expanding distribution of topical CBD products

Cbd whole foods

One of our editors tried a bunch of non-psychoactive CBD products to help control her anxiety levels.

The first time I ever heard about CBD oil was on a podcast. Then I saw it on a drink menu. Soon it showed up on my favorite website, and as an add-on at my favorite matcha place. It reached the hands of my favorite Instagram influencers, and appeared as a new ingredient in my beauty products. So what is CBD, exactly?

It’s advertised as a miracle oil derived from hemp. When applied topically it’s meant to relieve pain. When you vape it, eat it, drink it, or droplet it into your mouth, it reportedly can help treat epileptic seizures, manage anxiety, chill you out or aid in going to sleep. Unlike marijuana, CBD doesn’t get you high. Some swear by its effects, but recently, there has been pushback against it. Some people have even called it “snake oil.” So does it actually work? I had to try.

First things first, I live in Los Angeles. The CBD trend hit both New York and LA, hard. It’s fairly easy to get your hands on CBD oil here — whether you’re popping into Moon Juice, Whole Foods, or even Urban Outfitters. Plus, this is 2019. You can order almost anything online.

Secondly, I have terrible anxiety. I think it is one of my defining characteristics (unfortunately). I am prone to anxiety attacks and I do take a prescribed medication when they become overwhelming. However, I tend to vibrate with nerves most of the time anyway (fun!). I have been trying to combat them with yoga and therapy, but taking an oil every day sounds like a faster fix (or a potential disaster), and at this point in my life I am game for anything!

Lastly, I don’t burn, bro. I don’t 420 blaze it. I’m high on life, baby! No judgement to anyone at all, I just don’t smoke weed. So I would like to reiterate, although CBD is a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, it is non-psychoactive and cannot get you high. I repeat, it is not THC. It will not get you high. Dad, are you listening?

I decided to start with Charlotte’s Web, the CBD oil brand I had heard about first on that podcast. I looked them up online and was absolutely shook by the prices of their tinctures. The most expensive one retails for $275 and the cheapest that I could find was $99 (Now they offer a $39.99 option, but they didn’t at the time). So, that’s one thing about most reputable CBD tinctures, they’re not cheap. Luckily, the next day I happened to be shopping at Bristol Farms (a California-based supermarket) and found some on sale for $60.

The brand offers various dosages, so as a first-timer I started with the lowest offered, which is their “Full Strength CDB Oil.” The bottle offers 6.65 milligrams of CBD per milliliter. The flavor was olive oil (although they do offer a Mint Chocolate version online).

I had high hopes, but reader, I could not get past the taste. I am very sensitive to flavors, which is great for some things (like taste-testing Pringles) and bad for others I suppose. I could have tried mint, but honestly, I hate artificial mint flavoring. I abandoned this one after a few days despite the brand’s suggestion that I could put it in something like a smoothie, coffee or yogurt.

Also, I didn’t feel like it was doing anything to me! I had read that consistency is key, but I wanted to be consistent with something that didn’t make me gag when I smelled it — which honestly made me feel more anxious! Apparently, this product has worked for a lot of people. Great news for them! But it’s not for me.

While on my quest to find something tasty that I could take daily, I stopped by Moon Juice — which offers juices as well as coffees and matchas with adaptogenic “dusts.” My local shop offers CBD as a beverage add-in. The brand is still Charlotte’s Web, but they only offer the highest dosage.

I decided “what the heck” and ordered a CBD-infused iced matcha, hoping the flavor of the tea would conceal the olive oil taste. And it did! Not only was the drink tasty as always (I love Moon Juice and am not being paid to say this) but it made this warm feeling spread through my body like a non-sleepy calm, and this was only a single dose. But I wondered if it might just be a placebo effect. Was I just imagining this? Or had something changed?

After some light Googling, I found that the original dosage I had been taking wasn’t high enough. Apparently, the right dosage for your body is a total Goldilocks situation. You may have to try out a few different amounts before you get it just right. I wasn’t imagining things. The higher dosage actually helped.

Soon after, I was able to try a CBD oil tincture from another brand. Our editor-in-chief suggested I try Hawaiian Choice CBD oil, which she’d heard about through a former colleague in Hawaii whose husband launched the company. Their products come in a spray bottle. Each spray delivers 10 milligrams, and the company advises users take one to three sprays and hold it under their tongue for 30 seconds before swallowing. The bottle is expensive — $99, but it’s also flavored with passionfruit, pineapple, noni (a Polynesian fruit), and Big Island honey. Plus, it has a higher dosage than the first Charlotte’s Web product that I tried.

The particular tincture I tried is labeled “Active,” and the bottle says it’s meant to help with exercise and appetite control. It did nothing for my appetite (nor did I want it to) but the flavor situation here is a game changer. It tastes like candy. It also seemed to impact my anxiety levels in a major way. It worked!

One Daily Meal editor tried a bevy of CBD products to help manage her anxiety, and she was extremely pleased with the results. ]]>