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Of course, what is beyond question is that alcohol damages brain cells. Alcohol use is associated with a wide variety of cancers, including cancers of the esophagus, stomach, colon, lungs, pancreas, liver and prostate. Marijuana use has not been conclusively associated with any form of cancer. In fact, one study recently contradicted the long-time government claim that marijuana use is associated with head and neck cancers.

It found that marijuana use actually reduced the likelihood of head and neck cancers. If you are concerned about marijuana being associated with lung cancer, you may be interested in the results of the largest case-controlled study ever conducted to investigate the respiratory effects of marijuana smoking and cigarette smoking. Donald Tashkin at the University of California at Los Angeles, found that marijuana smoking was not associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer. Surprisingly, the researchers found that people who smoked marijuana actually had lower incidences of cancer compared to non-users of the drug. Addiction researchers have consistently reported that marijuana is far less addictive than alcohol based on a number of factors. In particular, alcohol use can result in significant and potentially fatal physical withdrawal, whereas marijuana has not been found to produce any symptoms of physical withdrawal. Those who use alcohol are also much more likely to develop dependence and build tolerance. Alcohol use increases the risk of injury to the consumer.

Many people who have consumed alcohol or know others who have consumed alcohol would not be surprised to hear that it greatly increases the risk of serious injury. Research published in 2011 in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, found that 36 percent of hospitalized assaults and 21 percent of all injuries are attributable to alcohol use by the injured person. Meanwhile, the American Journal of Emergency Medicine reported that lifetime use of marijuana is rarely associated with emergency room visits. According to the British Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, this is because: “Cannabis differs from alcohol … in one major respect. This means that cannabis rarely contributes to violence either to others or to oneself, whereas alcohol use is a major factor in deliberate self-harm, domestic accidents and violence.” Interestingly enough, some research has even shown that marijuana use has been associated with a decreased risk of injury. Impact on the Community: Alcohol use contributes to aggressive and violent behavior. Studies have repeatedly shown that alcohol, unlike marijuana, contributes to the likelihood of aggressive and violent behavior. An article published in the Journal of Addictive Behaviors reported that “alcohol is clearly the drug with the most evidence to support a direct intoxication-violence relationship,” whereas “cannabis reduces the likelihood of violence during intoxication.” Alcohol use is a major factor in violent crimes. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism estimates that 25% to 30% of violent crimes in the United States are linked to the use of alcohol. of Justice, that translates to about 5,000,000 alcohol-related violent crimes per year. By contrast, the government does not even track violent acts specifically related to marijuana use, as the use of marijuana has not been associated with violence. (Of course, we should note that marijuana prohibition, by creating a widespread criminal market, is associated with acts of violence.) Alcohol use contributes to the likelihood of domestic abuse and sexual assault. Alcohol is a major contributing factor in the prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault. This is not to say that alcohol causes these problems; rather, its use makes it more likely that an individual prone to such behavior will act on it. For example, a study conducted by the Research Institute on Addictions found that among individuals who were chronic partner abusers, the use of alcohol was associated with significant increases in the daily likelihood of male-to-female physical aggression, but the use of marijuana was not. Specifically, the odds of abuse were eight times higher on days when men were drinking; the odds of severe abuse were 11 times higher. The website for the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) identifies alcohol as the “most commonly used chemical in crimes of sexual assault” and provides information on an array of other drugs that have been linked to sexual violence. Given the fact that marijuana is so accessible and widely used, it is quite telling that the word “marijuana” is not included. [8] ” —Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol [14] Charlene Egby , also known as Charlo Greene , a former reporter for KTVA-TV in Anchorage, Alaska, was discussing the Alaska Cannabis Club, when she outed herself on live television as the owner of the club. She continued on, "[I] will be dedicating all of my energy toward fighting for freedom and fairness, which begins with legalizing marijuana here in Alaska," followed by "f*ck it, I quit." [16] Greene released a video a few days later detailing why she quit on air and calling for people to vote "yes" on Measure 2. The following is a text excerpt from her video: “ Who is willing to take a stand? But if you are, I don't judge you or any other man. Nearly a century of marijuana prohibition and stigma have stained America, the land of the free and home of the brave.

But we have a chance to start taking back the right. Today it's marijuana prohibition and, once we get that done nationally, we the people will realize that we are stronger than ever and you will feel empowered to take up what you choose to fight. Advocating for freedom and fairness should be everyone's duty. I'm making it my life work, to uphold what America stands for truly: life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — ideals that now need to be defended. Total campaign cash as of December 2, 2014 Support: $1,022,230 Opposition: $1,306,447. As of December 2, 2014, The Alaska Campaign to Regulate Marijuana had received a total of $897,230 in contributions. on 2, 3, and 4 was registered to support all three measures on the November 2014 ballot in Alaska. The committee reported $125,000 in contributions and expenditures. All of the committee's funds were provided by the Progressive Kick Independent Expenditures, which was located in Oakland, California.

[17] [18] PAC/ballot measure group Amount raised Amount spent The Alaska Campaign to Regulate Marijuana $897,230 $1,181,447 Yes!

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