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cooking with cannabis coconut oil

How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Introduction: How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil)

Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It’s great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, too – you can use indica, sativa, or even high CBD strains to get the desired effect you want.

It’s also super easy to make, and a great way to use up excess trim, kief or hash from harvest. In this instructable I’ll show you my favorite way to do it – simmering on the stove top! But I’ll tell you how to do it in a crockpot too.

This is a very fast and no-fuss version of canna oil – through lots of reading and quite a few experiments I really don’t believe it’s necessary to simmer it for-ev-errr and over complicate it. This method will give you a potent, tasty and fancy canna oil.

Step 1: What You’ll Need

tools:

  • cheesecloth
  • metal strainer/sieve
  • bowl or large measuring cup
  • jar or bowl to store the canna oil

materials:

  • decarboxylated cannabis (buds, trim, kief, hash – 40 grams)
  • unrefined coconut oil (2 cups)

We’ll talk a little about dosing on the next step.

Unsure how to decarboxylate cannabis? Click here to find out!

Step 2: Dosing + Strains + Expectations

(Pictured above – Doctor Who water hash, Doctor Who in bud form – so purple. Doctor Who sugar leaf trim)

What I’m using for this batch:

  • 2 cups unrefined coconut oil
  • 40 g Doctor Who trim, decarboxylated

This is a fairly strong dose – about 1.5 g of trim per tablespoon of canna oil. The medibles this canna oil makes will be used primarily for combating migraines so stronger is better!

Guidelines for dosing:

I recommend using anywhere from 0.5-1.5 g of trim/bud/hash/etc per tablespoon of oil. If this is your first time experimenting with canna oil, try using 16 grams of cannabis to 2 cups of oil.

When using buds, it’s okay to use less than you would if you were using trim as there will be more trichromes present and therefore more THC. If I was using buds instead of trim in this batch, I probably would have used 0.5 grams of bud per tablespoon of coconut oil.

For more information on dosing cannabis, I really recommend picking up a copy of The Ganja Kitchen Revolution by Jessica Catalano. The book includes a very nice dosing chart and explains how to demystify making edibles with the right amount of THC for you.

This article on The Cannabist also includes a helpful way of figuring out the THC content in edibles.

What to expect when using canna oil:

Cannabis taken orally a totally different beast – it can take you much longer to feel it, and the effects can linger much longer on average. Canna oil is often quite potent and can make you super sleepy, so never try a new dose when you have obligations later. 😉

You can try to combat sleepiness by using only sativas in your canna oil, or by choosing a strain high in CBD. But it might still make you a teeny bit tired (edibles always do that to some folks!), so always use caution.

What to do if you take too much canna oil:

If you ever take too much while trying to figure out the proper dose, don’t worry! You may feel anxious or wonder why you ever thought this was a good idea – but I promise it will pass and the benefits are worth it.

Your best bet is to drink a glass of water and lie down. Sleeping is always the best possible way to handle having a bit too much cannabis.

If sleep seems unreachable, try dimming the lights and putting on music or the TV. You can try talking to someone too. Whatever relaxes you! Just keep in mind that it will pass in a few hours at most.

Step 3: Combine the Coconut Oil and Cannabis and Simmer

Combine the cannabis and coconut oil in a small saucepan over the lowest heat you can manage.

Once the coconut oil has melted, let the mix simmer uncovered (stirring ever so often) for an hour.

HEY! If you’d like to do this in a crockpot you definitely can. Just let it go on low for a couple hours. It’s not necessary to take it longer than that.

If your canna oil turns out super green or not green at all, that’s fine. The green-ness relates only to the chlorophyll present, not how strong the canna oil is.

Step 4: Strain

For straining, use cheesecloth in a sieve over a large measuring cup. A sieve normally isn’t fine enough on its own! It won’t matter too much if you end up with particulates in the oil, but it always looks nicer without them.

Place two layers of cheesecloth in the sieve and put it over the measuring cup.

Pour the hot oil and cannabis mixture into the cheesecloth.

Let it drip for an hour or so and then squeeze the rest out by hand.

You can use the processed cannabis in other things once you’ve squeezed out the oil, but it shouldn’t have much THC left in it at all. One of the most awesome ways is to mix it with softened butter – you end up with an awesome cannabis compound butter that you can use on toast or maybe even put a dollop on a steak or under the skin of a chicken.

However, don’t feel bad if you just compost it or throw it out – nearly all the good stuff is in the canna oil now!

Step 5: Cool and Store

Pour the canna oil into a glass jar or bowl and leave uncovered until room temperature and beginning to solidify. (Leaving it uncovered is very important because we want to avoid condensation forming in the jar)

Once entirely cooled, close the container and store in the fridge or in a cool dark place. This will keep for up to a year!

See how dark it is before and how light it is when it solidifies? That’s what it should look like if you don’t simmer it too long and you’re not too rough with it. If you poked it a ton it might be more green.

Step 6: Using Cannabis Coconut Oil

You can consume this coconut canna oil on its own or use it in edibles!

If this is your first time trying it, I recommend taking 1/4-1/2 tablespoon by mouth to start. Wait at least 3-4 hours before taking more. How you feel after this will let you know if you need to increase or decrease your dose. It will also give you a baseline for edibles.

If making edibles, try using recipes you’ve made before. Knowing how many cookies, muffins, slices of cake, etc. that a recipe produces will allow you to figure out about how much THC per serving there is. (Because we know we’re using a certain amount of cannabis per tablespoon of coconut oil – you can determine the strength based on the amount of oil you used in the recipe and how many servings it makes)

Another good thing to keep in mind: you can even do half canna oil and half butter if you need the edibles to be a little less strong.

How to Make Cannabis Coconut Oil (canna Oil): Cannabis coconut oil is a really versatile way to consume cannabis. It's great taken alone or baked into all kinds of edibles – most strains of cannabis beautifully complement the flavor of coconut oil! Canna oil makes medicating super accessible, t…

Cooking with Cannabis

the ultimate free patient guide to cooking with medical marijuana

Intro to Cooking with Cannabis

If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!

Decarboxylation

Using cannabis as a medicine begins with understanding the basic science of decarboxylation, and why it is a crucial process in making edibles, tinctures and topical treatments. To get the full medicinal value out of your cannabis, it needs to be heated to a temperature that is just not possible to obtain in the human digestive system. The major downside of decarboxylating is that some of the more volatile terpenes (and other aromatics) that give the plant its signature aroma and flavor are lost during the process. Adding an equal amount of raw material to the decarboxylated materials may improve the taste and/or smell of your creations, but learning how to properly decarboxylate cannabis from the get-go will save you a lot of time, energy, money and product when cooking with cannabis.

The Decarboxylation Process

The predominant compounds found in cannabis are THCA and CBDA. THCA is the major cannabinoid in Cannabis , while CBDA predominates in fiber-type hemps. THCA and CBDA accumulate in the secretory cavity of the glandular trichomes, which largely occur in female flowers and in most aerial parts of the plants. The concentration of these compounds depends on the variety of cannabis and its growth, harvesting and storage conditions. When locked in their acidic forms, THCA and CBDA are not bioavailable to the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Occurring either naturally within the plant, or upon “ decarboxylation ” (heating the plant material), these acids are non-enzymatically decarboxylated into their corresponding neutral forms (THC and CBD).

THCA is non-psychoactive (meaning it does not produce mind and body altering effects). If you want to achieve the full psychoactive effects of your butters, fats, oils, sugars or alcohols, decarboxylating the plant material to convert the THCA to THC prior to infusion is essential.

Control of heating temperatures and times is critical when cooking with cannabis. Heating cannabis also converts THC to CBN. At about 70% decarboxylation, THC is converted to CBN at a faster rate than the THCA is converted to THC. Higher CBN levels will produce more sedative effects.

Studies show cannabidiol (CBD) has tremendous medical potential, especially in the treatment of seizure disorders and pediatric patients. Indications also suggest CBD lowers blood sugar, which makes it desirable for treating diabetes. Its sedative properties make it useful in the treatment of stress-related and sleep disorders. CBDA and CBD are non-psychoactive. Unlike THCA and THC, converting CBDA to CBD will not make a psychoactive product. CBD has a calming effect. This makes it ideal for treating children, the aged or patients that prefer less psychoactive effects. THC vaporizes quicker than CBD, so decarboxylating higher CBD varieties may produce higher CBD-enriched material. However, if you are not using a high CBD strain, extending the heating process may accomplish no more than burning off the THC.

There is much debate and opinion on this process and very little scientific evidence to establish the best method. The only real way to prove the safety, consistency and potency of your cannabis products is to have them lab tested.

How to Decarboxylate Cannabis

Forewarning: There will be a very strong odor of cannabis during this process.

  1. Preheat oven to 225° F / 110° C.
  2. Line an oven-safe dish (or a rimmed baking sheet) with parchment paper.
  3. Breaking up cannabis buds into smaller pieces by hand, place the material in the dish close together but not stacked on one another (the less unused space the better).
  4. When oven is pre-heated, bake for about 20 minutes to remove the moisture (depending on the freshness of the material). Watch for the plant color to get darker (a light to medium brown shade). When it is time to remove from the oven, the material should be crumbly looking.
  5. Set plant material aside and wait until it is cool enough to handle. Turn oven up to 240° F / 115° C and wait for it to preheat again.
  6. When the cannabis is cooled, lightly crumble by hand and distribute evenly over the bottom of the dish.
  7. Cover dish with aluminum foil, crimping the edges tight to seal and return to the oven. Continue baking for another 45-60 minutes for higher THC and 60-90 minutes for higher CBD.
  8. Remove from oven and allow to cool fully before removing the foil. Depending on the material you use, it may be fine enough and require no further processing. If not, you can place the material in a food processor or blender, pulsing the cannabis until it is coarsely ground. Be careful not to over grind the material, as you do not want a super fine powder.
  9. Place in an airtight container (glass preferred) and store in a cool, dry place.

Learn how to cook marijuana into your favorite baked dishes and become an educated cannabis chef that can infuse any meal!