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Population research in Chinese people shows that drinking 120-599 mL of green tea or oolong tea daily is linked to a lower risk of developing high blood pressure. Drinking more than 600 mL daily is linked to an even lower risk. Also, early clinical research suggests that taking green tea extract daily for 3 months or drinking green tea three times per day for 4 weeks reduces blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. Analysis of clinical research shows that green tea can reduce systolic blood pressure (the top number) by up to 3.2 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) by up to 3.4 mmHg in people with or without high blood pressure.

But several smaller studies show that green and black tea have no effect on blood pressure. Women who regularly drink tea, including green or black tea, appear to have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer. But green tea does not seem to prevent ovarian cancer from recurring in people with a history of ovarian cancer. Some research shows that drinking caffeinated beverages can reduce the risk of Parkinson disease. Drinking one to four cups daily seems to provide the most protection against developing Parkinson disease. Early research suggests that applying a solution containing a certain chemical found in green tea to the skin for 8 weeks reduces acne. Abnormal protein buildup in the body (amyloidosis). Early research shows that drinking green tea or taking green tea extracts for 12 months protects against an increase in heart mass in people with amyloidosis affecting the heart.

There is conflicting evidence about the effects of green tea on athletic performance. Some early research suggests that taking green tea extract as a beverage doesn't improve breathing or performance in people undergoing endurance training. But other early research shows that taking specific pills containing a component of green tea three times daily with meals for a total dose of seven pills, improves some breathing tests during exercise in healthy adults. Some population evidence suggests that drinking green tea is linked to a lower risk of bladder cancer. Population research suggests that drinking green tea is not linked to a reduced risk of breast cancer. But there is some evidence that it might be linked with a reduced risk of breast cancer development in Asian-Americans but not Asian people. Green tea might have different protective effects in people depending on their genotype or whether they have gone through menopause. In people with early-stage but not late-stage breast cancer, drinking green tea seems to be linked with a reduced risk of breast cancer recurring. People who drink at least three cups of green tea daily might have a lower risk of death from heart disease. Research suggests that taking a specific green tea extract daily for 4 months does not affect cervical cancer risk in women with HPV infection. Abnormal cells on the surface of the cervix (cervical dysplasia). Early research shows that taking a green tea product by mouth or applying it to the skin might reduce cervical lesions caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. Most evidence suggests that drinking green tea is not linked with a reduced risk of colon or rectal cancer. However, some research suggests that consuming a high amount is linked to a reduce risk, particularly in women. Also taking green tea extract daily for 12 months seems to reduce the redevelopment of colon and rectal tumors (metachronous adenomas) in people who previously underwent surgery to treat colon and rectal tumors. Early research shows that taking a specific product containing green tea and other ingredients reduces cold symptoms and duration. Population research suggests that Japanese adults who drink four or more cups of green tea daily have a 44% to 51% lower risk for depression than those who drink one cup or less. Population research suggests that Japanese adults, particularly women, who drink 6 or more cups of green tea daily, have a lower risk of developing diabetes. Also, population research suggests that drinking at least one cup of green tea per week is linked with a lower risk of developing impaired fasting blood sugar in Chinese people. Impaired fasting blood sugar is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. However, some research shows that drinking green tea three times per day does not help control blood sugar in people with prediabetes. Also, taking green tea extract does not seem to help control sugar or insulin levels in people who already have diabetes. Overall, some evidence suggests that drinking green tea might help prevent diabetes from developing. But most research suggests that drinking green tea or taking green tea extract does not help control blood sugar in people who already have diabetes. Some population research suggests that drinking green tea is linked to a reduced risk of esophageal cancer. Some research suggests that drinking green tea is linked to a reduced risk of esophageal cancer in only women, but not men.

Also, some population research suggests that drinking green tea that is very hot is linked to an increased risk of esophageal cancer. Drinking decaffeinated green tea does not seem to benefit people already diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Early research found that drinking green tea is linked to a reduced risk of fracture when compared with not drinking green tea. There is conflicting evidence about the effects of green tea on stomach cancer risk. Some population research suggests that drinking at least 5 cups of green tea daily is not linked with a reduced risk of stomach cancer. But other population research suggests that drinking at least 10 cups of green tea daily is linked with a reduced risk of stomach cancer.

Early research shows that drinking green tea might help increase blood pressure in elderly people who have low blood pressure after eating. This increase in blood pressure is probably due to the caffeine in green tea. Early research suggests that taking green tea extract and theanine lowers the risk of getting the flu. Other early research suggests that taking a specific product containing green tea and other ingredients reduces flu symptoms and duration. Gargling with green tea at least three times daily for 90 days doesn't seem to prevent the flu in high school students.

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