cvs health orlando call center

We pursue traffickers of all forms of illegal narcotics—including marijuana, which remains illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act and is therefore unmailable. Our prohibited narcotics program focuses on the disruption of organized narcotics-trafficking operations, to help protect employees and customers from the violence related to drug trafficking, and to inhibit the spread of illegal or unmailable substances into neighborhoods across America.” Postal Service Doubles Down on Cannabis Enforcement, Issues Nationwide Policy. Though states can legalize marijuana possession under local law, possession for any reason outside limited research technically remains a federal crime, as does shipping cannabis through the mail. More than 200 federal laws protect the sanctity of the U.S.

Postal Inspection Service, one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the country. Postal inspectors are federal agents, mandated to safeguard the nation’s mail, including the people who move it and the customers who use it. On average, 1,000 suspects are arrested by postal inspectors each year for trafficking drugs and laundering drug money via the U.S mail. In addition to seizing cash obtained through criminal activity, postal inspectors have used federal forfeiture laws to seize houses, vehicles, boats, artwork, and other high-value items purchased with drug money. Statistical trends: Mailing marijuana and other drugs. In the anarchy of the legalization movement, some cannabis users dismissed the run-of-the-mill driving delivery system and instead have taken to mailing their product. In an effort to assess the scale of the trafficking taking place within the USPS, we tried to get our hands on as much relevant data as possible.

We were semi-successful in this undertaking, only managing to get information covering the period 2012 to 2015. Consequently, you’ll have to excuse the somewhat empty looking graph below. It’s as patchy as a 13-year-old’s facial hair, but it’s all we got right now since we hadn’t the time to submit a Freedom of Information request. The earliest available data covers the fiscal year 2012. Nationwide, during this period, inspectors found roughly 42,000 lbs of marijuana packaged in about 7,600 parcels. The following year, postal inspectors, in cooperation with local and national law enforcement agencies, secured 2,622 arrests and indictments for mailing controlled substances, up from 2,299 arrests and indictments the preceding year. Marijuana proved to be comprehensively the most common drug intercepted by inspectors — cannabis intercepts comprised 68 percent of 13,389 drug-related seizures in 2013, up from 67 percent of 11,322 seizures the year before. 2013 ended on a high, with the Postal Inspection Service intercepting almost 20 percent more parcels and making 14 percent more arrests and indictments for mailing controlled substances than in the preceding year. Which Illegal States Are the Most Cannabis Curious? The trend seems to have been bucked, however, as the levels of marijuana detected in the postal system declined in 2014. This just happened to coincide with the country’s first licensed recreational marijuana stores opening in Washington and Colorado. The number of marijuana parcels seized by inspectors fell more than 12 percent in 2014, with a coinciding decrease in the total weight of captured cannabis. This trend appears to have continued throughout 2015, with a further drop in the total amount of marijuana seized in parcels to 34,305 lbs; an almost 13 percent fall. It’s pretty much impossible to explain the decrease in the numbers, an effort made more difficult by the fact that no one knows just how much marijuana successfully makes it through the Postal Service undiscovered. Is it just a coincidence, though, that the level of detected cannabis has fallen as more states wholly legalize? Prohibition has been seen in the past to encourage and incentivize the black market. Perhaps, as cannabis becomes increasingly mainstream and regulated, the lure of the black market is removed through easier access and the realization that shipping the drug is no longer worth the risk of harsh federal charges. Why do people risk getting caught mailing cannabis? Why are there so many people willing to take a chance on something like mailing cannabis? Could there really be possible upsides to sending cannabis in the mail? Ever since marijuana laws have progressed in states like Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska, the threat that more cannabis might flood areas where it’s not legal has been a common concern for those opposed to legalization. Whether or not legal cannabis in Oregon is making its way to Raleigh through the mail, it’s never really explained why this is worse than illegal cannabis getting here from other places.

Despite possible federal punishment for mailing controlled substances over the Postal Service, it may actually be better. For one, getting marijuana in the mail is certainly much safer than getting it on the street from some shady dealer. When it comes to obtaining illicit drugs, there’s always a risk something can go wrong as a result of the product’s prohibition, whether it’s getting assaulted by a squirrely dealer or getting some terrible weed that leaves you with a headache for the rest of the day. New Study Confirms That Cannabis Can Help Migraine Sufferers. Even though legal cannabis seems to be accomplishing something that the drug war never could, a huge proportion of it still comes from Mexico. It’s grown, packaged, and shipped from south of the border, which has created many jobs.

However, as more states changed their laws, some of those jobs have moved to places like Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and California, thus sending Mexican cartel imports tumbling. The latest data shows that while agents hit a seizures pinnacle in 2009, getting their hands on around 4 million pounds of cannabis, they only confiscated about 1.5 million pounds last year. Mail-ordering marijuana would be another way for consumers to expand a budding industry that helps farmers and keeps decent jobs in America. Smuggler’s Blues: US Legalization is Crashing Mexico’s Cartel Market. And finally, let’s face it, the USPS could do with the extra traffic.

Menu

Get in touch