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Many people wonder if what’s in the stores is safe and effective. It felt like we had to weigh in now.” The Risk Posed by Unethical Companies. After addressing the national craze CBD has ignited, Gupta focuses on the controversial side of things. “Many [people think] because it’s non-psychoactive, it’s safe – [they’re] thinking, can’t hurt, might help, why not? “Because CBD is not regulated, the products are not required to go through safety testing or even prove they are authentic.

While CBD itself is generally safe and non-psychoactive, there are unscrupulous players taking advantage of people. We went out to investigate if the craze had gone too far. And what we uncovered was surprising, to say the least.” Gupta met with Jay Jenkins, a teenager who was hospitalized due to a tainted CBD oil product called YOLO. A similar issue was seen in Salt Lake City, Utah, where several people were also hospitalized due to YOLO. Gupta says lab tests showed this product did not contain CBD but rather a synthetic cannabinoid. He then met with a family similar to Figi’s: The Wilson family. They moved from New Jersey to Colorado in order to get their daughter, who suffered from seizures, access to CBD. Unfortunately, CBD didn’t work for her seizures the way it did for Figi’s. The lack of regulation in the CBD industry poses problems, Gupta says.

In one research study, for example, researchers tested 84 CBD products. “The product you are buying at your local store or online is not regulated,” Gupta says. The buyer should know that and take precautions.” Gupta then explored the regulatory side of CBD by taking a trip to a small town in the U.K. where a company called GW Pharmaceuticals produces Epidiolex, a pharmaceutical product used to treat seizures that is derived from cannabis. Here, Gupta addressed one major area of concern in the world of CBD: Is it better for companies to go the pharma route or the supplement route with their products? The pharma route has more oversight and regulation, of course, but nearly all CBD companies are going the supplement route in order to keep up with rising consumer demand. Gupta mentioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s ever-changing role related to CBD, citing their increased involvement in coming down on fraudulent companies as of late. Shortly before wrapping up, Gupta took a look at the promising side of CBD. There are myriad potential benefits to using the product, in particular when it comes to helping addicts manage pain without the use of opioids. There is a paucity of research on CBD, Gupta says, with only five studies examining its potential therapeutic benefits. Gupta ended by addressing one major question: How can consumers be discerning when purchasing CBD products? He encouraged people to read the ingredients label on their CBD product carefully and look for a certificate of analysis from the company. When I hear the word 'weed,' I remember rummaging through my messy college dorm room in search of a Ziplock baggie with enough flower inside for a spliff. That word reminds me of Pink Floyd posters hung with multicolored tacks, feeling excited about a new South Park episode, and three-hour cases of the giggles as I made the first friends with which smoking rituals were established. 'Cannabis,' on the other hand, sounds like science. It’s new to our colloquial vocabulary; I hadn’t heard of this word until I was decidedly into weed and looked at its plant genus on a Wikipedia page. ‘Cannabis’ is something more serious sounding than ‘pot’–it doesn’t like like something you chug while hanging upside down at a tailgate. It sounds like something that requires a degree of responsibility and esteem, even; ‘cannabis’ doesn’t sound like a habit one ought to outgrow upon adulthood. Science Reveals The Cannabis Industry’s Greatest Lie: You’re Buying Weed Wrong (And So Is Everyone Else) Trump Rally Sees Joe Biden’s Presidental Odds Surge: Presidential Election Betting Update. MedMen’s Failure Is Everything Wrong With Legal Cannabis (And Is Only The First Company To Implode) Do these words mean two different things? They’re both terms for a cannabis plant rife with complex cannabinoids like THC, CBD and CBN. But calling it ‘pot’ or ‘weed’ versus ‘cannabis’ does bring to mind different associations, and have their own effects on the perceptions of others. I use the word ‘cannabis’ because I think it legitimizes referring to this thing by its truest identity: a plant. Thinking about it as a plant helps strip away the socially-attributed associations of illegal contraband and deadend pastime. You aren’t considered a bad parent for eating tomatoes regularly. Enjoying the smell and effect of lavender isn’t considered an unhealthy addiction. If one is talking about cannabis, one is given a tiny chance to demonstrate not only how they refer to this plant, but how they think about it.

Merely proving that all kinds of “normal,” self-aware, functioning members of society aren't scared to talk about or consume cannabis is the way to most effectively start changing closed minds. If we challenge people to think about it as something other than the drug their parents told them to stay away from, a different word altogether, you just might make a crack big enough for them to start questioning long-held stigmas. The word ‘marijuana’ never really entered my vocabulary due to the clunky syllables, and considering the possibly malicious popularization of the word in order to malign Mexican immigrants, maybe it never was a proper name. The first legitimization of the word appeared in the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937 , at a point in time where many believe the United States government intentionally coined a foreign-sounding name. Anti-immigration sentiment had been on the rise throughout the 1930s during the Great Depression, with so few jobs to go around in general. Some cultural critics assert that legislators selected a term like ‘marijuana’ for its associations with the Mexican language, thus feeding fear and xenophobia towards the plant and the Mexican people.

But as we’ve seen with other derogatory-turned-empowering terms, the meaning and power of words can transform over time, and have their own effect on the society in which the words exist. Weed, cannabis, pot or marijuana: what's the difference? The origin of the word ‘marijuana’ might come as a surprise. There are lots of things we don't know about how cannabis legalization is going to look in Canada in 2018. Among them: how policing agencies in New Brunswick are expected to make sure users are securing their stashes in locked boxes, how drivers are going to be reliably tested for THC, and whether having a cottage means you get to double down on the four-plants-per-household rule.

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