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Some CBD products may yield cannabis-positive urine drug tests

In a study of six adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that a single vaping episode of cannabis that is similar in chemical composition to that found in legal hemp products could possibly result in positive results on urine drug screening tests commonly used by many employers and criminal justice or school systems.

The U.S. government defines hemp as any crop of cannabis containing 0.3% THC or less in dry weight. THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) is the substance in cannabis that confers a “high” and produces the subjective and cognitive effects that are typically synonymous with cannabis. The 2018 U.S. Farm Bill legalized the production and sale of hemp, and now as a result, consumer hemp products, such as oils, vaping cartridges and hemp flowers for smoking can be legally purchased in specialty stores, general retail stores and through websites across the U.S.

Hemp is now increasingly finding use in medicine and wellness markets, particularly for its component CBD, short for cannabidiol, which is one of the more than 100 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. According to New York-based investment bank Cowen & Co., the market for CBD last year ranged from $600 million and $2 billion in sales. Despite the size of this booming industry, it remains largely unregulated.

In a paper published Nov. 4 in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, the researchers report that two out of six study participants tested positive after vaping cannabis that contained 0.39% THC using urine testing methods that are consistent with testing frequently performed for employment-related or criminal justice-related urine drug testing programs. Though the cannabis used in this study does not currently meet the federal definition of hemp, the THC concentration of 0.39% exceeds federal regulation by just 0.09%.

“People who use legal hemp products for medical intent rarely just use them once as we did in this study, and prior studies show that THC and its metabolites may accumulate with repeated use,” says postdoctoral fellow Tory Spindle, Ph.D., a researcher in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “What this means is that people need to be wary of single-dose or cumulative THC exposure and be aware that these now legal products may cause an unexpected positive result on a drug test.”

“Because the market for CBD products is so new and the popularity of use is growing so quickly, we want the public to be aware that a positive drug test is possible,” says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Vandrey and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania previously showed in a JAMA study that 21% of CBD/hemp products sold on the Internet contained THC, even though it wasn’t listed on the product labels. “I have a hard time finding anyone who hasn’t used a CBD product at least once, but most are completely unaware of the possibility of THC exposure or a positive drug test as a result of using these newly legalized products,” says Vandrey.

trials demonstrated CBD to be an effective treatment for two rare forms of pediatric epilepsy, however, there is currently insufficient evidence to support use for any other health condition according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Despite this, CBD product suppliers and consumers claim benefits of CBD for a wide range of purposes, including everything from anxiety to insomnia to general wellness. CBD products can be swallowed in the form of an oil/tincture, eaten in a food product (e.g., gummy bears), inhaled using “vape pens” similar to electronic cigarettes, or applied topically to the skin in a cream, patch, balm or gel.

For the current study, the researchers recruited three women and three men with an average age of 31 years old. One participant self-reported as African American and the rest as white.

The batch of cannabis used in this particular study contained 10.5% CBD and 0.39% THC, a 27 to 1 ratio of CBD to THC that is similar to what is often found in legal hemp/CBD products. In the study, research volunteers vaporized a little less than 1 gram of cannabis, which contained a total dose of 100 milligrams of CBD and 3.7 milligrams of THC. To vape the cannabis, heated cannabis vapor was collected into a balloon that was then inhaled by the participant.

In addition to vaping the high CBD/low THC cannabis, study volunteers also were given pure CBD in a capsule, vaporized pure CBD and placebo (a mock CBD pill and vaporized cannabis in which CBD and THC had been removed) in three other dosing sessions, one week apart from each other. In all active drug conditions (excluding placebo), the CBD dose delivered was 100 milligrams per session.

The drug testing cut-off used to determine a “positive” result in this study was a “screening” concentration of at least 50 nanograms per milliliter of THCCOOH, a metabolite used to indicate whether someone has used cannabis, in the urine sample using an on-site “dipstick” test. A positive on that test was then “confirmed” at a 15 nanograms per milliliter cut-off of THCCOOH using a more sensitive test method.

Two of the six participants who vaped the low-THC/high-CBD cannabis tested positive for THCCOOH.

No positive urine drug test results were observed in the other test sessions (pure CBD capsules, pure CBD vape or placebo).

“These results suggest that pure CBD, used once by itself, will not cause a positive drug test,” says Vandrey. Adding to this, Spindle points out that it “does not take much THC exposure to trigger a positive test for some people.” There may be variation from person to person in drug metabolism and puffing behaviors such as inhalation depth, which might contribute to the breakdown or buildup of cannabinoids in the body, the researchers say.

The team says they plan to repeat their studies using products that fall within the current federal hemp regulations with respect to THC content, and additionally study the impact of repeated CBD/hemp exposure on drug testing outcomes.

Other authors on the study were Edward Cone and George Bigelow of Johns Hopkins, David Kuntz of Clinical Reference Laboratory, John Mitchell of RTI International and Ronald Flegel of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

This research was supported by SAMHSA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (T32DA07209).

COI: Vandrey has been a paid consultant for or received honoraria from Zynerba Pharmaceuticals, FSD Pharma and Canopy Health Innovations Inc.

Hemp is now increasingly finding use in medicine and wellness markets, particularly for its component CBD, short for cannabidiol, which is one of the more than 100 cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. According to New York-based investment bank Cowen & Co., the market for CBD last year ranged from $600 million and $2 billion in sales. Despite the size of this booming industry, it remains largely unregulated.

In a paper published Nov. 4 in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology, the researchers report that two out of six study participants tested positive after vaping cannabis that contained 0.39% THC using urine testing methods that are consistent with testing frequently performed for employment-related or criminal justice-related urine drug testing programs. Though the cannabis used in this study does not currently meet the federal definition of hemp, the THC concentration of 0.39% exceeds federal regulation by just 0.09%.

“People who use legal hemp products for medical intent rarely just use them once as we did in this study, and prior studies show that THC and its metabolites may accumulate with repeated use,” says postdoctoral fellow Tory Spindle, Ph.D., a researcher in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. “What this means is that people need to be wary of single-dose or cumulative THC exposure and be aware that these now legal products may cause an unexpected positive result on a drug test.”

“Because the market for CBD products is so new and the popularity of use is growing so quickly, we want the public to be aware that a positive drug test is possible,” says Ryan Vandrey, Ph.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Vandrey and his collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania previously showed in a JAMA study that 21% of CBD/hemp products sold on the Internet contained THC, even though it wasn’t listed on the product labels. “I have a hard time finding anyone who hasn’t used a CBD product at least once, but most are completely unaware of the possibility of THC exposure or a positive drug test as a result of using these newly legalized products,” says Vandrey.

Trials demonstrated CBD to be an effective treatment for two rare forms of pediatric epilepsy, however, there is currently insufficient evidence to support use for any other health condition according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Despite this, CBD product suppliers and consumers claim benefits of CBD for a wide range of purposes, including everything from anxiety to insomnia to general wellness. CBD products can be swallowed in the form of an oil/tincture, eaten in a food product (e.g., gummy bears), inhaled using “vape pens” similar to electronic cigarettes, or applied topically to the skin in a cream, patch, balm or gel.

For the current study, the researchers recruited three women and three men with an average age of 31 years old. One participant self-reported as African American and the rest as white.

The batch of cannabis used in this particular study contained 10.5% CBD and 0.39% THC, a 27 to 1 ratio of CBD to THC that is similar to what is often found in legal hemp/CBD products. In the study, research volunteers vaporized a little less than 1 gram of cannabis, which contained a total dose of 100 milligrams of CBD and 3.7 milligrams of THC. To vape the cannabis, heated cannabis vapor was collected into a balloon that was then inhaled by the participant.

In addition to vaping the high CBD/low THC cannabis, study volunteers also were given pure CBD in a capsule, vaporized pure CBD and placebo (a mock CBD pill and vaporized cannabis in which CBD and THC had been removed) in three other dosing sessions, one week apart from each other. In all active drug conditions (excluding placebo), the CBD dose delivered was 100 milligrams per session.

The drug testing cut-off used to determine a “positive” result in this study was a “screening” concentration of at least 50 nanograms per milliliter of THCCOOH, a metabolite used to indicate whether someone has used cannabis, in the urine sample using an on-site “dipstick” test. A positive on that test was then “confirmed” at a 15 nanograms per milliliter cut-off of THCCOOH using a more sensitive test method.

Two of the six participants who vaped the low-THC/high-CBD cannabis tested positive for THCCOOH.

No positive urine drug test results were observed in the other test sessions (pure CBD capsules, pure CBD vape or placebo).

“These results suggest that pure CBD, used once by itself, will not cause a positive drug test,” says Vandrey. Adding to this, Spindle points out that it “does not take much THC exposure to trigger a positive test for some people.” There may be variation from person to person in drug metabolism and puffing behaviors such as inhalation depth, which might contribute to the breakdown or buildup of cannabinoids in the body, the researchers say.

The team says they plan to repeat their studies using products that fall within the current federal hemp regulations with respect to THC content, and additionally study the impact of repeated CBD/hemp exposure on drug testing outcomes.

Other authors on the study were Edward Cone and George Bigelow of Johns Hopkins, David Kuntz of Clinical Reference Laboratory, John Mitchell of RTI International and Ronald Flegel of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

This research was supported by SAMHSA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (T32DA07209).

A small study concludes that caution is warranted for users of ‘high CBD, low THC’ cannabis products.

Will Smoking CBD Hemp Flower Show up on a Drug Test?

Many people turn to CBD because they want a safe, herbal solution to their physical or mental discomforts. Since hemp-derived CBD products are now legal in the U.S. the number of people trying CBD flower grows by the day. But, what impact does this have on drug testing? It’s the question on everyone’s minds.

In this article, we’re going to answer that question and many others. We’ll talk about the benefits of CBD flower, the different strain types, the variety of terpenes in hemp flower, and much more.

Let’s get started!

What is CBD Hemp Flower?

This is a good question to answer before diving into the specifics of drug screenings. CBD flower is one of the four main components of the hemp plant. On a fully mature hemp plant, you’ll find a stock, leaves, flower, and seeds.

The flower contains the highest percentage of CBD compared to the other three components. When the flower is bucked (cut off) the stems, they’re hand-trimmed and sold as CBD flower.

You can buy CBD hemp flower to smoke or to make your own CBD oil or butter. The oil or butter can be used in edible recipes, skincare products, added to tea or ingested as is. You get to decide!

Will I Fail a Drug Test After Smoking CBD?

Ok, here’s the deal. Labs that perform drug screenings don’t actually test for CBD since it’s non-intoxicating. So, to set the record straight, you can’t fail a drug test because of CBD.

However, a drug test does look for traces of THC in your urine. THC or tetrahydrocannabinol is the psychoactive cannabinoid in the cannabis plant and a cousin of CBD.

There are small traces of THC in full-spectrum CBD products. CBD isolates and broad-spectrum products, on the other hand, are THC-free. At least they should be.

Sadly, even when you consume a THC-free product it can result in a false-positive because not all drug tests are 100% accurate. The test could confuse CBD for THC, which can cause an inaccurate reading.

On top of that, several factors can influence the outcome of your drug test result. These include the source of your CBD, the amount you consume, how long you consume it for, your individual body chemistry, and more.

Also, there’s the concern over whether the label on your product is accurate. It could say 0% THC, but without evidence, such as a Certificate of Analysis (COA) from a third-party lab, you won’t know for certain.

Until the FDA starts to regulate the marketing of CBD products, not every company is going to act in good faith. This is why you only want to buy from a trusted brand with a strong reputation. One that tests its products for potency and safety. We’ll get more into this later.

The Impact of Drug Screenings in the United States

As of December 2018, CBD containing less than 0.3% THC has been federally legal in the U.S. Since then, employers all over the country are trying to assess how CBD is going to impact their mandatory drug screenings. Millions of employees are required to take drug tests, so it’s a legitimate concern to have.

Countless individuals buy and consume hemp-derived CBD products to help with a number of ailments. Many of these people take the products daily, if not multiple times during the day.

So, what are your choices if you want to smoke CBD flower, but are subject to random drug testing?

To take some precautions, you can consider a detox protocol to eliminate THC from your system . You can also have a chat with your HR representative and ask for more details on the drug screening your company runs.

As always, please do what you feel is best for you. We’re only providing recommendations, not actual legal advice.

Additionally, as more states continue to legalize medical and recreational cannabis (33 states have so far), we think many employers will stop screening for THC.

After answering the question, “will smoking CBD flower make me fail a drug test,” let’s talk more about hemp flower, how it can make you feel, it’s benefits, and other important details.

First, let’s start with a question that might be troubling you.

Why Is There THC in CBD Hemp Flower?

Although the hemp plant has a much different chemical profile than its cousin, marijuana, it still produces many of the same cannabinoids that marijuana does. For instance, the main cannabinoid created by hemp is CBD (cannabidiol). It also produces CBG, CBC, CBN, and THC.

In contrast, the primary cannabinoid produced by marijuana is THC. Over the years, marijuana has been purposely bred to produce high amounts of THC to benefit medical users and recreational users alike.

However, by definition, industrial hemp yields very low concentrations of THC. As we mentioned earlier, hemp products must contain less than 0.3% THC to comply with federal regulations. In fact, licensed hemp farmers in the U.S. are required to have their hemp plants tested to ensure the THC levels remain below this threshold. Otherwise, they cannot legally sell them in the open marketplace.

So, yes, THC does exist in trace amounts in CBD flower. However, it’s not high enough to cause psychoactive effects.

Is Smoking CBD Flower Good For You?

It can be when you choose the best CBD flower strain for you . Some of the most popular strains out there include Hawaiian Haze, Sour Space Candy, and Lifter. Each strain has varying levels of CBD and other cannabinoids.

Plus, they have their own unique terpene profile which produces the CBD flower’s aroma and taste. Terpenes can also promote certain therapeutic effects, similar to the benefits people get with aromatherapy.

Here’s a list of the most common hemp terpenes and their aromas:

  • Myrcene: fruity & musky
  • Caryophyllene: spicy & peppery
  • Pinene: piney & earthy
  • Linalool: floral & lavender-like
  • Limonene: citrusy & sweet
  • Humulene: hoppy & woodsy

How about we walk through an example together, using Hawaiian Haze CBD Hemp Flower as our model. This strain’s aroma is sweet and has tasting notes of pineapple and papaya, thanks to its tropical terpene profile.

Some users who smoke hemp report uplifting effects that make socializing fun and easy. While others enjoy this strain at night because it’s relaxing and calming. Overall, Hawaiian Haze has the ability to increase your happiness factor and allow any anxiousness to simply melt away.

This is one reason people enjoy smoking CBD for anxiety because they get positive results, without any dangerous side effects. So, next time someone asks you, “ why smoke CBD flower ,” you’ll know exactly what to say.

Are There Side Effects of Smoking CBD Hemp Flower?

Before buying and smoking hemp flower, consider this. CBD is well-tolerated by most people, it’s non-habit forming, and has very few side effects . However, smoking CBD or Delta 8 Vapes versus consuming CBD oil or edibles isn’t ideal if you have pre-existing lung conditions.

We’re not aware of anything else besides this one circumstance. But, please consult with your doctor if you’re taking any prescription medications.

Where Can I Buy The Best CBD Flower?

You’re ready to buy CBD hemp flower, but where should you go? No need to leave your house. You can find CBD flower with incredible quality and amazing effects from your laptop or smartphone.

Before starting your search, keep these tips in mind.

Ideally, you’ll want hemp flower that was grown in the United States, was independently tested by a third-party lab and has the effects and terpenes you desire.

At Organic CBD Nugs, we source our CBD flower from master hemp growers in Oregon. We lab test all our flower and provide details about the strain effects and terpene profiles. Plus, we have many happy customers who leave reviews on our site. See what others are saying about our wholesale CBD hemp flower .

Many people turn to hemp flower because they want a safe, herbal solution to their physical or mental discomforts but what impact does this have on drug testing? It’s the question on everyone’s minds.