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kestrel hemp car

Kestrel hemp car

Kestrel – Canada’s Cannabis Electric Car
When you make a race car or electric car for that matter, you extensively use carbon fiber to keep it as light as possible to increase its performance and fuel economy. Making a new breakthrough in this field, Canada based company, Motive Industries, has come up with Kestrel, which is a bio-composite bodied electric car. The material used in its making isn�t carbon fiber but Cannabis fiber called hemp.

Kestrel is the first vehicle for the Canadian automotive industry, and this vehicle for four is made of bio material derived from the hemp mats produced by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF). Don�t take Hemp otherwise as it is a variety of cannabis, and it�s the most interesting as well as exotic material we�ve seen used in car design this year.

The best part, however, is it�s cheap, lighter, as impact-resistant as fiberglass, green and above all it�s legally grown in Canada under license from Health Canada. Engineered by Darren McKeage for a program called Project Eve, Kestrel will undergo prototyping and testing later this month. The vehicle will be finally unveiled at the EV 2010 V� Conference and Trade Show in Vancouve this September. (Article from AutoMotto)

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Kestrel hemp car Kestrel – Canada’s Cannabis Electric Car When you make a race car or electric car for that matter, you extensively use carbon fiber to keep it as light as possible to

Introducing Kestrel, The First Road-Ready Car Built Out Of Hemp

Fast Fiber

Marijuana’s fibrous cousin hemp has a long history with auto makers. in 1941 Henry Ford unveiled a car body made primarily out of organic fibers, hemp included. seventy years later, the world’s first production-ready biocomposite electric car—with hemp as the “bio”—will finally hit the streets. The Kestrel, a three-door hatchback, is made of a “hemp composite as strong as the fiberglass in boats, yet incredibly lightweight,” says Nathan Armstrong, the president of Motive industries, Kestrel’s manufacturer.

Whereas a comparably sized Ford Fusion weighs 3,720 pounds, the Kestrel will be just 2,500 pounds with the battery. this “might be the sweet spot for electric vehicles,” Armstrong says, because the car’s low tonnage means a fuel-efficiency increase of 25 to 30 percent.

To make this resilient, lightweight compound, hemp stalks are combed and rolled into a mat that is infused with a polymer resin. the hemp makes the biocomposite’s flexibility similar to the carbon fiber used in racecars.

Hemp grows fast and it’s cheap, which should keep the Kestrel’s production price around $25,000. A prototype is nearly complete, Armstrong says, and Motive plans to have thousands of its hemp-mobiles on the road by 2012.

Marijuana’s fibrous cousin hemp has a long history with auto makers. in 1941 Henry Ford unveiled a car body made primarily out of organic fibers, hemp included. seventy years later, the world’s first production-ready biocomposite electric car—with hemp as the “bio”—will finally hit the streets. The Kestrel, a three-door hatchback, is made of a “hemp composite as strong as the fiberglass in boats, yet incredibly lightweight,” says Nathan Armstrong, the president of Motive industries, Kestrel’s manufacturer. ]]>