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The Different Forms of Marijuana

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Andrea Rice is an award-winning journalist and a freelance writer, editor, and fact checker specializing in health and wellness.

Marijuana is a product of the hemp plant (cannabis sativa) and appears as a green, brown, or gray mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers.

Stronger forms of marijuana include sinsemilla (sin-seh-me-yah, a Spanish word for “without seeds”), hashish (“hash” for short), and resins like hash oil, wax (similar to lip balm), and shatter (an amber colored solid), which contain high doses of the active ingredients.

You may hear marijuana called by street names such as pot, herb, weed, grass, boom, Mary Jane, gangster, or chronic. There are more than 1,200 slang terms for marijuana.

Other Forms of Marijuana

With the advent of legalized marijuana for medical and recreational purposes in some states has come the development of other types of products that contain marijuana. Some people vaporize it with a vape pen, while others may still smoke marijuana out of pipes and bubblers or roll joints, spliffs, and cigars (called blunts).

There are edible marijuana products with marijuana or marijuana oils cooked into or infused into them. Marijuana oil is used to produce all kinds of edible products from cookies and cakes to gummy bears and chocolate bars. Marijuana oils can be added to all kinds of beverages, from sodas and energy drinks to teas and elixirs.

Sprays, and Tinctures

There are also flavored marijuana sprays that can be sprayed directly under your tongue for a quick high, or sprayed on marijuana joints and blunts.

Marijuana tinctures—marijuana in a solution of alcohol—can also be used under your tongue to produce a fast-action, intense high.

We have come a long way from the day when the vast majority of raw marijuana was rolled into joints or stuffed into pipes.

All Forms Are Mind-Altering

All forms of marijuana are mind-altering. In other words, they change how your brain works by attaching to molecules on the brain and activating them, typically creating the effects of euphoria, relaxation, and a sharper perception of things like colors, smells, and sounds.   For some people, the effects are unpleasant and may result in paranoia, fear, panic, or anxiety.

All forms of marijuana also contain delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active chemical, as well as more than 500 other chemicals.   Marijuana’s effects on the user depend on the strength or potency of the THC it contains.

The potency of marijuana has increased since the early 1990s when the THC content was less than 4%. In 2018, potency was around 15%, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  

Marijuana Use Disorder

Like any substance, using marijuana can lead to a marijuana use disorder, which may involve dependence or addiction. In fact, ​recent research shows that 30% of people who use marijuana may have some sort of marijuana use disorder.  

You feel withdrawal symptoms when not using, including irritability, feeling restless, craving marijuana, decreased appetite, trouble sleeping.

You are unable to stop using marijuana, even if it interferes with your social, family, work or school, or financial life.

If you think you may have a marijuana use disorder, it’s important to seek help from a healthcare provider.

Marijuana in its basic form is a green, brown, or gray mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of the cannabis plant.

Medical Marijuana FAQ

In this Article

In this Article
In this Article
  • What is medical marijuana?
  • What is medical marijuana used for?
  • How does it help?
  • Can medical marijuana help with seizure disorders?
  • Has the FDA approved medical marijuana?
  • How do you take it?
  • What are the side effects of medical marijuana?
  • Which states allow medical marijuana?
  • How do you get medical marijuana?

While every state has laws dictating the use ofВ medical marijuana, more than two thirds of U.S. states and the District of Columbia have actually legalized it for medical treatmentsВ and more are considering bills to do the same. Yet while many people are using marijuana, the FDA has only approved it for treatment of two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome andВ Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.В

Why hasn’t more research been done? One reason is that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) considers marijuana a Schedule I drug, the same as heroin, LSD, and ecstasy, and likely to be abused and lacking in medical value. Because of that, researchers need a special license to study it, says Marcel Bonn-Miller, PhD, a substance abuse specialist at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

That may not change anytime soon. The DEA considered reclassifying marijuana as a Schedule II drug like Ritalin or oxycodone, but decided ito keep it as a Schedule I drug.

The agency did, however, agree to support additional research on marijuana and make the process easier for researchers. “Research is critically needed, because we have to be able to advise patients and doctors on the safe and effective use of cannabis,” Bonn-Miller says.

He shared some background on medical marijuana’s uses and potential side effects.

What is medical marijuana?

Medical marijuana uses the marijuana plant or chemicals in it to treat diseases or conditions. It’s basically the same product as recreational marijuana, but it’s taken for medical purposes.

The marijuana plant contains more than 100 different chemicals called cannabinoids. Each one has a different effect on the body. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the main chemicals used in medicine. THC also produces the “high” people feel when they smoke marijuana or eat foods containing it.

What is medical marijuana used for?

Researchers are studying whether medical marijuana can help treat a number of conditions including:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Appetite loss
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Diseases effecting the immune system like HIV/AIDS or Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Eating disorders such as anorexia
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Mental health conditions like schizophrenia and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Muscle spasms
  • Nausea
  • Pain
  • Seizures
  • Wasting syndrome (cachexia)

But it’s not yet proven to help many of these conditions, with a few exceptions, Bonn-Miller says.

“The greatest amount of evidence for the therapeutic effects of cannabis relate to its ability to reduce chronic pain, nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, and spasticity [tight or stiff muscles] from MS,” Bonn-Miller says.

How does it help?

Cannabinoids — the active chemicals in medical marijuana — are similar to chemicals the body makes that are involved in appetite, memory, movement, and pain.

Limited research suggests cannabinoids might:

  • Reduce anxiety
  • Reduce inflammation and relieve pain
  • Control nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy
  • Kill cancer cells and slow tumor growth
  • Relax tight muscles in people with MS
  • Stimulate appetite and improve weight gain in people with cancer and AIDS

Can medical marijuana help with seizure disorders?

Medical marijuana received a lot of attention a few years ago when parents said that a special form of the drug helped control seizures in their children. The FDA recently approved Epidiolex, which is made from CBD, as a therapy for people with very severe or hard-to-treat seizures. In studies, some people had a dramatic drop in seizures after taking this drug.В

Has the FDA approved medical marijuana?

The cannabidiol EpidiolexВ was approved in 2018 for treatingВ seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. In addition, the FDA has approved two man-made cannabinoid medicines — dronabinol (Marinol, Syndros) and nabilone (Cesamet) — to treat nausea and vomiting from chemotherapy. The cannabidiol EpidiolexВ was approved in 2018 for treatingВ seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

How do you take it?

To take medical marijuana, you can:

  • Smoke it
  • Inhale it through a device called a vaporizer that turns it into a mist
  • Eat it — for example, in a brownie or lollipop
  • Apply it to your skin in a lotion, spray, oil, or cream
  • Place a few drops of a liquid under your tongue

How you take it is up to you. Each method works differently in your body. “If you smoke or vaporize cannabis, you feel the effects very quickly,” Bonn-Miller says. “If you eat it, it takes significantly longer. It can take 1 to 2 hours to experience the effects from edible products.”

What are the side effects of medical marijuana?

Side effects that have been reported include:

  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Hallucinations
  • Low blood pressure

The drug can also affect judgment and coordination, which could lead to accidents and injuries. When used during the teenage years when the brain is still developing, marijuana might affect IQ and mental function.

Because marijuana contains some of the same chemicals found in tobacco, there have been concerns that smoking it could harm the lungs. The effects of inhaled marijuana on lung health aren’t clear, but there’s some evidence it might increase the risk for bronchitis and other lung problems.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says marijuana can be addictive and is considered a “gateway drug” to using other drugs. “The higher the level of THC and the more often you use, the more likely you are to become dependent,” Bonn-Miller says. “You have difficulty stopping if you need to stop. You have cravings during periods when you’re not using. And you need more and more of it to have the same effect.”В В Learn more about the long-term effects of marijuana use.

Another issue is that the FDA doesn’t oversee medical marijuana like it does prescription drugs. Although states monitor and regulate sales, they often don’t have the resources to do so. That means the strength of and ingredients in medical marijuana can differ quite a bit depending on where you buy it. “We did a study last year in which we purchased labeled edible products, like brownies and lollipops, in California and Washington. Then we sent them to the lab,” Bonn-Miller says. “Few of the products contained anywhere near what they said they did. That’s a problem.”

Which states allow medical marijuana?

Medical marijuana is legal in 33В states and the District of Columbia:

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • West Virginia

States allowing legal recreational use include: Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington

States that allow restricted use only include: Alabama, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina,South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,В Wisconsin and Wyoming.В

How do you get medical marijuana?

To get medical marijuana, you need a written recommendation from a licensed doctor in states where that is legal. (Not every doctor is willing to recommend medical marijuana for their patients.) You must have a condition that qualifies for medical marijuana use. Each state has its own list of qualifying conditions. Your state may also require you to get a medical marijuana ID card. Once you have that card, you can buy medical marijuana at a store called a dispensary.

Sources

Marcel Bonn-Miller, PhD, adjunct assistant professor, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

National Conference of State Legislatures: “State Medical Marijuana Laws.”

National Institute on Drug Abuse: “Drug Facts: Is Marijuana Medicine?” “Is Marijuana Addictive?”

Drug Enforcement Administration: “Drug Schedules.”

Department of Health and Human Services.

Kaur, R. Current Clinical Pharmacology, April 2016.

PDQ Integrative, Alternative, and Complementary Therapies Editorial Board: “Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ).”

Schrot, R. Annals of Medicine, May 2016.

Epilepsy Foundation: “Learn About Medical Marijuana and Epilepsy.”

News release, Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s office.

WebMD shows you how medical marijuana works where it’s legal, what it’s used for and what side effects it might cause. ]]>