nu shop

General Policy for the Protection of Personal Data. The data we collect are only those necessary for the proper use of our service. By continuing to use our services beginning May 25, 2018, you acknowledge and agree to our updated Privacy Policy and Cookies Policy.

White, published in 1952, with illustrations by Garth Williams. The widely read tale takes place on a farm and concerns a pig named Wilbur and his devoted friend Charlotte, the spider who manages to save his life by writing about him in her web. Eight-year-old Fern Arable is devastated when she hears that her father is going to kill the runt of his pig’s new litter. Persuading him that the piglet has a right to life and promising to look after it, she saves the animal and names him Wilbur. When Wilbur becomes too large, Fern is forced to sell him to her uncle, Homer Zuckerman, whose barn is filled with animals who shun the newcomer. When Wilbur discovers that he will soon be slaughtered for Christmas dinner, he is horribly distraught. He sits in the corner of the barn crying, “I don’t want to die.” Charlotte—the hairy barn spider who lives in the rafters above his sty—decides to help him. With the assistance of a sneaky rat named Templeton and some of the other animals in the barn, she writes a message in her web: “Some Pig.” More strange messages appear in the web, sparking people from miles around to visit these “divine” manifestations and the pig that inspired them.

Charlotte accompanies Wilbur to the county fair, where she spins her last note: “Humble.” Wilbur wins a special prize, and his survival is ensured. It becomes apparent, however, that Charlotte is unwell. After laying hundreds of eggs, she is too weak to return to the Zuckerman’s farm. A saddened Wilbur takes the egg sac, leaving the dying Charlotte behind. Although most leave after hatching, three stay behind in the barn, and they and subsequent generations of Charlotte’s offspring comfort Wilbur for many years to come. Charlotte’s Web earned critical acclaim upon its release—Eudora Welty notably called it “just about perfect”—and it quickly became a beloved children’s classic. While humorous and charming, the novel also contains important lessons. For example, Fern’s caring for Wilbur teaches her responsibility, and she realizes that if she stands up for what she believes in she can make a difference in the world. Charlotte and Wilbur’s friendship, despite their differences in nature, teaches tolerance. As he grows up, like any child, Wilbur learns to cope with fear, loss, mortality, and loneliness. Although a story of life and death, it is also full of warmth, with silly characters such as the geese and the snobby sheep. In addition, Charlotte’s Web contains a wealth of detail about spiders and other animals, which White drew from his own life on a farm. Wilbur was allegedly inspired by an ailing pig that White tried unsuccessfully to nurse back to health. The incident served as the basis for the essay “Death of a Pig,” which was published in 1948, four years before the release of Charlotte’s Web . Fern Arable (Dakota Fanning) and Wilbur (a piglet, voiced by Dominic Scott Kay) are pals in E.B. This promotional work, for the live-action movie "Charlotte's Web," depicts the two friends together. Image, copyright Paramount, all rights reserved; provided here as fair use for educational purposes and to acquaint new viewers with the film. Andy White always believed that a farm is a place where there are strong smells and life is hard but rewarding. He took it as a part of the life cycle that animals, like people, are born and die. Although he wrote for a living, he struggled with getting his words just right. White reading an excerpt from Charlotte's Web .) According to his stepson, Roger Angell, he rewrote the first page of Charlotte's Web eight times.

After he finished the manuscript, White set it aside for awhile. When he went back to the story, he created a much bigger role for Fern.

In about 1970, he agreed to make an audio recording.

Menu

Get in touch