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Marijuana Sizes and Prices

Do you know enough about marijuana prices and the amount you can buy at one time? This is your guide to making good purchases when you visit your marijuana dispensary.

When you walk into a dispensary, do you ask for $20, $40, or $100 dollars worth of marijuana? Are you supposed to ask for marijuana by weight? How do you know if you are getting your money’s worth?

Most marijuana dispensaries use a standardized measuring system to weigh out the marijuana you purchase. Today, you’ll learn the increments in which marijuana is sold, what marijuana prices you should expect to pay, and other factors that can affect your final marijuana purchase price.

Marijuana Flower Amounts

Marijuana purchasing amounts have been largely standardized in dispensaries. When purchasing marijuana flower from a dispensary, it will typically be sold in either fractions of an ounce or in grams.

  • 1G = 1 gram
  • ⅛ ounce = 3.5 grams
  • ¼ ounce = 7 grams
  • ½ ounce = 14 grams
  • 1 ounce = 28 grams

In some instances, a dispensary may round an “eighth” up to 4 grams or promote a 5 gram eighth on certain days to drive traffic to their shop.

How Much Marijuana Should I Buy?

In most legal states, you can purchase and carry up to one ounce of marijuana flower at a time.

Many new users are curious how much marijuana flower they will need each day. This will depend entirely on how much and how often you will want to smoke. Do you just need it a once or twice a day? Or will you be smoking often throughout the day? The answer to this question often comes as you build experience with the plant.

Depending on the experience of a user, a gram can last anywhere from a single session to a day or more. Start off small – you can always visit the shop again.

*Remember, you can’t bring marijuana over state lines, so if you are traveling, only buy what you know you will need during your trip.

Currently (January 2018), you will find cannabis for sale at the following prices. These prices will vary depending on your location, the individual dispensary, the quality of the cannabis, and the taxes that need to be paid. Most often, the more you buy, the less you will pay per gram in total.

Typical marijuana prices:

  • One Gram : $7-$20
  • Eighth : $30-$60
  • Quarter : $50-$120
  • Half Ounce : $100-$225
  • Ounce : $170-$375

What Affects Marijuana Pricing:

When shopping for marijuana flower, there are a number of factors that may affect pricing to keep in mind.

Potency : One of the main influences on marijuana prices you pay is how potent the marijuana is. As a general rule, the higher a percentage of cannabinoids like THC and CBD in a sample of marijuana flower, the more expensive it will be. Potency can be linked to a strain’s genetics, and some marijuana strains are naturally more potent than others. It can also be linked to how well a strain is grown. Many dispensaries can provide you with independent lab testing results showing potency for individual strains they are selling.

Freshness : Another factor affecting marijuana prices will be its freshness. Older, drier marijuana will lose some of its fragrance, flavor, and even potency as terpenes and cannabinoids begin to break down from exposure to the environment around it. THC, the psychoactive compound in marijuana, degrades to CBN through decarboxylation, making it less potent. You can often determine freshness by smelling and visually inspecting marijuana flower. Fresh, carefully stored marijuana should be fragrant and smell fresh.

Quality of buds : Finally, the overall quality of the marijuana buds themselves can affect how much you pay. If a strain is mostly larger, thumb sized buds, it can command a higher price. Popcorn buds or smaller will often see a reduction in price. How well a strain is trimmed can also affect price since excessively leafy buds can negatively affect the smoke.

Often, dispensaries will categorize their offerings by “shelf”, taking the above factors into consideration. Top shelf signifies a premium product which will command a higher price, while bottom shelf denotes a lower quality product which will be offered at a discount price.

Marijuana Taxes:

State and local marijuana taxes will also affect the final price of marijuana flower in a legal dispensary.

Recreational marijuana states have added specialized marijuana taxes to all purchases.

  • California: 15% sales tax, $2.75–$9.25 cultivation tax per ounce.
  • Oregon: 17% sales tax
  • Washington: 37% sales tax
  • Nevada: 15% sales tax
  • Colorado: 15% excise tax, 10% sales tax
  • Alaska: $50/ounce
  • Maine: 10% sales tax
  • Massachusetts: 3.75% sales tax

These taxes may exist along with standard retail sales tax, excise taxes, and any local taxes that are added, which can significantly drive up final costs to users. According to the Tax Foundation , consumers in Colorado may face up to 5 taxes:

  • 15 percent excise tax
  • 10 percent state tax on retail marijuana sales (falling to 8 percent as of July 1, 2018)
  • 2.9 percent state sales tax
  • local sales taxes (the average rate in Colorado is 4.6 percent)
  • local excise taxes on marijuana, such as the 3.5 percent tax in Denver

Some states also levy a tax on medical marijuana. California has added a 15% sales tax on all cannabis sales, including medical marijuana. Similarly, the following states have added taxes to medical marijuana.

  • Arizona : 6.6% medical marijuana sales tax
  • Colorado : 2.9% generic sales tax
  • Hawaii : 4.5% generic excise tax on Oahu; 4% generic excise tax everywhere else
  • Illinois : 1% sales tax under the state’s pharmaceutical rate; 7% privilege tax paid by sellers and growers
  • Maine : 5.5% medical marijuana sales tax
  • Nevada : 2% medical marijuana excise tax
  • New Jersey : 7% generic sales tax
  • New York : 7% medical marijuana excise tax
  • Pennsylvania : 5% medical marijuana excise tax
  • Rhode Island : 7% generic sales tax; 4% medical marijuana surcharge paid by the seller
  • Washington, D.C. : 5.75% generic sales tax

Getting Started with Marijuana

You can find all the information you need about marijuana, including how to get a medical marijuana card, how to grow your own cannabis at home, and which strains are the most popular on our Cannabis 101 page .

Marijuana sizes and prices vary depending on multiple factors. Click to read about what can affect the price of cannabis and about common marijuana sizes.

Will Cannabis Job Growth Continue to Outpace Tech Job Growth?

The question of whether or not to legalize medical and recreational cannabis in the U.S. has been debated for over a century. While cannabis is still illegal under federal law, numerous states have legalized marijuana use over the past two decades. Beginning with medical legalization in California in 1996, the drug is now legal (in at least some limited medical capacity) in 29 states and the District of Columbia .

This shift has led to significant growth within the industry’s legal job market, creating a plethora of new career opportunities for small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs), which account for the majority of companies in the legal cannabis industry, and job seekers alike.

Overall industry growth

In 2016 alone, nine states made marijuana (either medical or recreational) legal. Shortly after, the number of cannabis industry job posts rose dramatically. According to ZipRecruiter data, the total number of industry job posts increased by 445% in 2017, compared to an increase of just 18% one year prior.

Our data also shows that the cannabis industry is growing more rapidly than some of today’s fastest-growing fields. Year over year growth of job posts in the cannabis industry is outpacing both tech (254% growth) and healthcare (70% growth)— by some reports, there are 14% more legal marijuana workers than there are dental hygienists in the U.S.

Our Q4 data for 2017 revealed an especially dramatic leap in the number of new cannabis industry job posts. The number of cannabis industry job posts increased 693% year over year and 79% quarter over quarter. This impressive growth can probably be attributed to SMBs preparing for the kick-off of retail cannabis sales in Q1 of 2018 in huge markets like California.

Where to find cannabis industry jobs

When we look at where opportunities in the cannabis industry are located, it’s no surprise that the majority of jobs are concentrated in some of the states that first legalized marijuana.

ZipRecruiter data shows that the top 5 MSAs ( metropolitan statistical areas) with the highest total number of job posts in 2017 were concentrated in Colorado, California, and Washington. When it comes to growth in this industry, we see the most significant growth in states that recently loosened their marijuana laws. Two out of the top 5 MSAs exhibiting the greatest job post growth are located in Florida, which legalized medical cannabis in 2016.

MSAs with the most marijuana job openings, according to ZipRecruiter job posting data:

  1. Los Angeles, CA
  2. San Francisco, CA
  3. Denver, CO
  4. Seattle, WA
  5. Miami, FL
  6. Portland, OR
  7. Las Vegas, NV
  8. San Jose, CA
  9. Santa Barbara, CA
  10. Tallahassee, FL

Not only does the legalization of cannabis create a safer and more stable market for medical and recreational users, but it also significantly drives job growth. In fact, analysis from New Frontier Data (a firm that focuses on the marijuana industry) found that the federal government could create at least $131.8 billion in tax revenue over the next eight years if cannabis were legalized in all 50 states. Their research suggests that federal legalization would immediately create 782,000 jobs, and the firm forecasts that that number would increase to 1.1 million jobs by 2025, including growers and retailers.

If you want to be a part of one of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S., you might consider applying for new types of jobs like Wellness Coordinator, Visual Merchandiser, or Post Harvest Technician.

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Marijuana is legal in 29 states and the District of Columbia, and the industry is hiring faster than ever. In fact, cannabis job growth now outpaces tech.