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Drug Interactions between cannabis and trazodone

This report displays the potential drug interactions for the following 2 drugs:

  • cannabis
  • trazodone

Interactions between your drugs

traZODone cannabis (Schedule I substance)

Applies to: trazodone and cannabis

Using traZODone together with cannabis (Schedule I substance) may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty concentrating. Some people, especially the elderly, may also experience impairment in thinking, judgment, and motor coordination. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Also avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Drug and food interactions

traZODone food

Applies to: trazodone

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of traZODone such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with traZODone. Do not use more than the recommended dose of traZODone, and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

cannabis (Schedule I substance) food

Applies to: cannabis

Alcohol can increase the nervous system side effects of cannabis (Schedule I substance) such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with cannabis (Schedule I substance). Do not use more than the recommended dose of cannabis (Schedule I substance), and avoid activities requiring mental alertness such as driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medication affects you. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Therapeutic duplication warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

See Also

  • Cannabis Drug Interactions
  • Trazodone Drug Interactions
  • Trazodone General Consumer Information
  • Drug Interactions Checker
Drug Interaction Classification
These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

A Moderate Drug Interaction exists between cannabis and trazodone. View detailed information regarding this drug interaction.

How Antidepressants Show Up on a Drug Test

Avoiding a False Positive Result on a Drug Screen

Nancy Schimelpfening, MS is the administrator for the non-profit depression support group Depression Sanctuary. Nancy has a lifetime of experience with depression, experiencing firsthand how devastating this illness can be.

Steven Gans, MD is board-certified in psychiatry and is an active supervisor, teacher, and mentor at Massachusetts General Hospital.

If you have depression and are taking a prescription medication like Prozac, you might worry that it could show up on a drug test. This is especially a concern if you must take a pre-employment drug screen for a new job.

Because antidepressants are not considered drugs of abuse, they are not included in common urine drug screens. However, there may be cross-reactions that can produce false positive results for the substances these tests are designed to detect.

Learn the actions you can take to ensure your results are interpreted accurately and your rights are protected.

Common Drug Screens

If you are in treatment for depression, the good news is that antidepressants are not the drugs that an employer is looking for in an employment drug screen. The lab would have to do specific additional tests to look for antidepressants. The types of substances tested for on a typical employment drug screens include:  

  • Amphetamines, including methamphetamine
  • Barbiturates
  • Benzodiazepines (tranquilizers)
  • Cannabinoids, including marijuana
  • Cocaine
  • Darvon (propoxyphene)
  • Opiates, including heroin, oxycodone, and hydrocodone
  • Phencyclidine (PCP)

Impact of Antidepressants

False positive test results can sometimes occur if a prescription drug or its metabolite has a similar chemical structure to the target drug being tested for.  

Some antidepressants can inadvertently trigger a false positive for a controlled substance. To avoid this, advise the tester about any drugs you may be taking so that confirmatory tests can be performed to weed out any false positive.

Certain antidepressant drugs are more prone to false-positive readings. For example, Wellbutrin (bupropion), Prozac (fluoxetine), and Desyrel (trazodone) can all potentially show up as amphetamines in a drug screen.

Similarly, Zoloft (sertraline) may show up as a benzodiazepine. Less commonly, antidepressants have been known to trigger false positives for LSD.

Preventing False Positives

If you are concerned that your antidepressant might show up as a false positive, your best course of action is to be proactive. In addition to informing the technician about your antidepressant use, bring along the prescription bottle and ensure that the drug is notated on your record. It is better to declare this before the test rather than after.

Due to the risk of false positives, all drug screen results should be considered presumptive until confirmed by a second testing technique, such as liquid or gas mass spectrometry.

If your drug screen is positive and a second confirmation test has not been done, demand that it be performed immediately, ideally with the same sample. Moreover, get a copy of both results to confirm that a different technique was used.

Protecting Your Privacy

Even if you are able to sort out any false positives from your drug screen, you may be concerned about the disclosure of your antidepressant drug use.

In most cases, any information you share with the tester won’t be included on the result. The employees at the lab and your present or future supervisor will likely have no direct contact with each other. All your employer will receive is a list of positive and negative results to the requested drug screens.

Workplace harassment and discrimination for depression and other mental health conditions are prohibited under the Americans With Disabilities Act,   but you may have valid concerns about your rights being upheld.

If you’re concerned about confidentiality, ask the tester for a copy of the company’s protected health information (PHI), outlining their legal duties and privacy practices as directed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Although awareness about mental health conditions such as depression has grown over the years, it is still common for people with depression to worry about the stigma associated with a depression diagnosis.

It is fully understandable that you would want your depression diagnosis to be kept private, especially from a current or prospective employer. You may fear you could be discriminated against or singled out for the condition in the workplace, even with the legal protections in place.

Preparing for the Test

First and most importantly, do not stop taking your medications or reducing the dosage unless you are doing so under the guidance of your physician. This is true even if you are concerned about false positives.

Even short-term interruptions can have serious consequences for the treatment of your condition, not least of which is antidepressant discontinuation syndrome (ADS).   Discuss any concerns you have with your mental health provider so you can take the drug screen safely and without stress.

It is also important to remember that antidepressants aren’t the only drugs that can trigger a false positive drug screen. Others include:

  • Advil (ibuprofen)
  • Aleve (naproxen)
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine)
  • Cardizem (diltiazem)
  • Dextromethorphan (found in Robitussin)
  • Glucophage (metformin)
  • Ritalin (methylphenidate)
  • Sudafed (pseudoephedrine)
  • Trandate (labetalol)
  • Ultram (tramadol)

A Word From Verywell

Facing a drug screen can make anyone anxious, especially when it is required for a job. You are not alone if you feel this way.

However, try not to stress unduly about taking a drug screen. Remember that false positives do happen and that most drug screening companies understand this. Simply divulge your prescriptions so that false positives can be avoided and your rights can be preserved.

Antidepressants aren't included on a usual drug screen test. You can take further steps to reduce the risk of a false positive for your prescription.