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Weed with blue flower

Thought this might be some spiderwort variety that came up wild in the Dallas area, but flower doesn’t match anything I could find. Any ideas? TIA

Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL

There are native Commelinas, like C. erecta.

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flora_uk

Commelina communis – Dayflower?

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bostedo

Thanks – that’s certainly it based on the unique flower. We appear to be on the southwestern edge of its U.S. penetration, so is not yet listed in any of the weed references I have for the area. Never would have figured it out.

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bostedo

purpleinopp: Thanks for pointing that out! Typed “comelina” (one ‘m’) when searching the NPD (wildflower.org db) which returned nothing. oops. Should have spelled it “dayflower”.

Looks like c. dianthifolia, c. erecta, and c. virginica are all native to our area. So will have to do some additional work to try to tell if what we have is one of these or the import. Will post what I find.

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Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL

Glad to try to help, I learned that myself from the excellent folks here at GW, just passing it on. Commelinas are a huge and confusing bunch, good luck!!

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bostedo

Okay, here’s what I’ve garnered so far:

Choice quickly narrows to c. communis vs c. erecta as they are the two with flowers having the smaller white third petal. Most notable difference I could find between these are in the spathe. It’s smooth and fully open to the base on c. communis while it has hairs and is open on top (or closed towards the base) on c. erecta. Leaves are usually lanceolate on c. erecta and more ovate on c. communis, but there is too much species variation to count on this alone.

In the new photo, I’ve annotated the closed portion and hairs of the spathe found on our plant. So looks pretty certain that it is one of the c. erecta varieties. I’ll try to find a place a few of these can grow to see the mature size and form before making a guess at a subspecies.

Does this sound right?

There’s a lot of comparison info posted on the Web, but the following link is to a pdf with the best summary comparison I found.

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Tiffany, purpleinopp Z8b Opp, AL

Good investigation! The Commelina I had ID’d here was in a “wild lawn” at a friend’s lake house. Gets mowed a few times a year. The Commelina was congregated near (within 10 feet of) the water, in “high shade” under mature trees with really high lower limbs, only getting morning sun from what I could tell. In that ID request post, someone from Z9 had complained it was taking over her beds. Any moist shade should make it happy.

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Iris GW

Here’s hoping it’s the native one! Good investigation on your part.

Here is a link that might be useful: Another link

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eahamel

I hope it’s the native, too. The Asian import is horribly invasive and very hard to get rid of.

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jekeesl (south-central Arkansas)

Hi bostedo. Your plant appears to be C. erecta. C. communis is easy to differentiate, because it has yellowish, false anthers with distinctive brown centers. I’ve added a photo from a local C. communis plant for comparison.

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bostedo

purpleinopp: This may be a tougher Texas strain. It took hold in a Mondo Grass border that went dormant during a record 100+ degree F heatwave in 2011. It has thrived on one deep watering per week in full sun along a concrete walk – likely one of the hottest spots in our yard. However, the border was removed earlier this year and apparently some Dayflowers were included with the MG transplanted to a very shady spot. As photo shows it’s taking a more upright form and not blooming yet in the shade, but otherwise seems happy. The spot is isolated, so will let them go and see what happens. Will have to deal with the others to keep them from expanding into the St Augustine now that the barrier is gone.

esh_ga: Thanks for the link. Had a couple other differences that were good to note.

jekeesl: Wow, that’s the more obvious kind of difference I was hoping for. Wonder why it was not included in other the comparisons. Maybe like leaf shape, it works for most cases, but there are occasional exceptions? Either way, it’s a great initial check. Thanks for pointing it out.

Included a link to some nice labeled images of c. communis covering features that are similar/common to c. erecta.

Thought this might be some spiderwort variety that came up wild in the Dallas area, but flower doesn't match anything I could find. Any ideas? TIA

Weeds With Blue Flowers in the UK

21 September, 2017

The UK is home to a large number of weeds with blue or bluish/purple flowers. Thankfully, many database resources now include color photos of both foliage and flowers. To aid in identification, note the shape of the leaves and any unusual features of the plant. The time of year of flowering, the height of the plant and even the location in which you found it can all help you to discover the identity of your yard or garden invader.

Bush Vetch

Bush Vetch or Vicia sepium is a relative of the pea, with the same ability to reach and grab on to nearby objects as it grows. Some homeowners choose this perennial for their wildflower gardens. It blooms from June to August, offering flowers that look similar to those of the sweet pea. Because it spreads through both seeds and its root system, it can be tough to clear completely from its chosen location. Down Garden Services recommends glyphosate treatment for this invader.

  • The UK is home to a large number of weeds with blue or bluish/purple flowers.
  • Bush Vetch or Vicia sepium is a relative of the pea, with the same ability to reach and grab on to nearby objects as it grows.

Forget-me-not

True Forget-me-not or Myosotis scorpioides is a perennial evergreen, sometimes appreciated for its flowers. The annual version, Common or Field Forget-me-not, or Myosotis arvensis, usually has flowers too small to appeal to passersby. These appear from April to October. The common version likes dry soil and spots where other plants struggle to grow. The plant can sometimes be identified through its hairy, blue-tinged leaves. Down Garden Services recommends pulling and composting the plant or applying a treatment of Paraquat or Diquat to eliminate it.

Germander Speedwell

Germander Speedwell or Veronica chamaedrys is a very common plant that creates blue flowers with a white center. Germander Speedwell has kidney-shaped, hairy leaves with serrated edges. The perennial flowers from April to July. The flowers contain four petals. The plant is difficult to contain because it tolerates most soils, spreads by runners and can regenerate from underground. It also can germinate in both spring and fall, spread through flowers or seed and produce over multiple seasons. Speedwell can be hand-weeded or chemically treated with a fluroxypyr and clopyralid herbicide, but homeowners must often repeat the process to get all of the plants.

  • True Forget-me-not or Myosotis scorpioides is a perennial evergreen, sometimes appreciated for its flowers.
  • The plant is difficult to contain because it tolerates most soils, spreads by runners and can regenerate from underground.

Slender Speedwell

Slender Speedwell or Veronica filiformis is a bigger troublemaker because it can be spread by mowing. If it occurs in an area where the ground will be moved or disturbed or mowing is planned, it is best to remove the plant by hand. Discard any clippings that may contain pieces of the root or stem after mowing. The plant can also be treated with Paraquat or Diquat. Slender Speedwell flowers from March to June.

The UK is home to a large number of weeds with blue or bluish/purple flowers. Thankfully, many database resources now include color photos of both foliage and flowers. To aid in identification, note the shape of the leaves and any unusual features of the plant. The time of year of flowering, the height of the plant …